Windbreak Ideas Please

GRB73

Songster
5 Years
Mar 10, 2016
180
184
151
SE Pennsylvania
I have a small (3' x 4') coop with three chickens. I'd like to provide a Windbreak to block the n/nw wind that pummels the coop most of the winter. We have a small yard with limited space. I've thought about attaching burlap to 5' poles. Or stacking hay bales. The latter I can get for free but my husband isn't too crazy about killing the grass under the bales. Anybody have other Windbreak ideas?
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
29,500
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NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
I cut up and stapled an old tarp to the N and W sides of my run. The coop has window covers I can close.
Are you just looking to provide a wind break to the coop or the run as well?
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,356
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Colorado Rockies
We're capable of lots of ideas, but you've not provided much information. How about a photo of your coop and yard for starters? And tell us where you are and what the climate is.

Seeing your coop and yard will provide us with an idea of your limitations. And knowing your climate will tell us about temperature gradients and local vegetation where we might get some ideas.

For example, where I live, the wind is so brutal at times, plastic sheeting stapled to a run will just rip off and flap madly in the wind. My wind breaks consist of fixed plastic panels and old full length glass doors to block both summer and frigid winter winds, each from a different direction. I also utilize native vegetation - slender straight juniper tree stems assembled into a windbreak fence. Juniper is like a prolific weed here.

I use burlap on my garden windbreak fences, but beware that it sags considerably when wet, and the wind whips it around so badly, it shreds in no time unless sandwiched between supports.
 

GRB73

Songster
5 Years
Mar 10, 2016
180
184
151
SE Pennsylvania
20181108_072809.jpg
Sorry for the late reply it's been a busy week. This is our little coop (without the back door). I will cover portions of the run with 4 mil greenhouse plastic as I've done during past winters. I always leave the south facing side of the run open for ventilation, except during very bad weather.
It is the coop I want to protect. Due to the size of our yard, this was the only spot we could place it. It gets hit by NNW winds all winter. We are in SE PA, northern Bucks Co., about 800' in elev. Winter temps can be as low as the single negatives, but are typically in the low teens at night. I thought a Windbreak might add another layer of protection to maintain heat in the coop. It is a twin walled coop with good ventilation on the front, back and sides.
Good point about burlap when it gets wet. We may try to use lattice now. Open to other suggestions too. Thanks
 

Granny Hatchet

Tastes like chicken
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Sep 26, 2013
144,124
226,722
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madison Indiana
My wind is horrid ! I sometimes wonder if it CAN get worse. LOL Not being able to access free straw bales I covered mine w/ a tarp and winds took it every time . I am using a dog kennel for a run and I added a tarp then tacked some lattice over the tarp. 3 yrs ago. Still standing strong. :yesss::frow
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,146
126,055
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Looks like you've got it 'covered' as best you can.
Tposts and some sections of wooden fencing is the only thing I can think to block wind.
 

Compost King

Free Ranging
Apr 19, 2018
3,304
11,493
707
Salisbury, North Carolina
I do not have much wind so its not something I need to do every winter, although I do this when temps get below 20 degrees. I screw or staple cardboard around the coops. I do a sloppy enough of a job that it will fall off come spring after it gets wet and heavy. Then I leave it for the chickens to scratch up. 6 months before Thanksgiving is when I shovel up all the coop and run bedding/Manure and compost it. This will stop the wind and in my case falls off the coop just in time for the season that needs more ventilation.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,356
33,463
1,122
Colorado Rockies
I do not have much wind so its not something I need to do every winter, although I do this when temps get below 20 degrees. I screw or staple cardboard around the coops. I do a sloppy enough of a job that it will fall off come spring after it gets wet and heavy. Then I leave it for the chickens to scratch up. 6 months before Thanksgiving is when I shovel up all the coop and run bedding/Manure and compost it. This will stop the wind and in my case falls off the coop just in time for the season that needs more ventilation.
"If NECESSITY is the MOTHER of INVENTION, then LAZINESS is the FATHER"
 

Granny Hatchet

Tastes like chicken
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Sep 26, 2013
144,124
226,722
2,037
madison Indiana
We're capable of lots of ideas, but you've not provided much information. How about a photo of your coop and yard for starters? And tell us where you are and what the climate is.

Seeing your coop and yard will provide us with an idea of your limitations. And knowing your climate will tell us about temperature gradients and local vegetation where we might get some ideas.

For example, where I live, the wind is so brutal at times, plastic sheeting stapled to a run will just rip off and flap madly in the wind. My wind breaks consist of fixed plastic panels and old full length glass doors to block both summer and frigid winter winds, each from a different direction. I also utilize native vegetation - slender straight juniper tree stems assembled into a windbreak fence. Juniper is like a prolific weed here.

I use burlap on my garden windbreak fences, but beware that it sags considerably when wet, and the wind whips it around so badly, it shreds in no time unless sandwiched between supports.
@azygous I have often wondered , How high can you safely stack hay bales ? (one thick and against a dog kennel/chain link) Would you know ?
 

MANNA-PRO

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