Winterizing questions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Chicks4fun2, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. Chicks4fun2

    Chicks4fun2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2014
    Pacific NW
    Ok, So I'm getting ready to get my coop ready for winter and this will be my first winter with my girls... With that said I have yet to winterize, and im looking for helpful advice. I have 5 urban birds 2 RIR, 2 BR and one EE with a fairly large uncovered 20'x15' run and a small covered run 4'x8' and their coop being 4'x4'x4'plus...I have 2 exterior nesting boxes and 2 roosts (the lower one never gets used)... My questions are fairly common ones regarding ventilation. I have a total of eight 3 inch diameter holes near the top. 4 on each side for cross ventilation. As you can see from the pics the roost they prefer is fairly close to the vents, Is this too close? Should I reduce the number of vents and lower the roost? I live in the Pacific Northwest and it gets chilly/damp most nights but only freezes for short periods in the coldest months (Dec-Feb). I have noticed they are eating a ton of feed which I believe means they are cold...(no worms) I also have two large windows across from each other that are not sealed... i plan on putting some moulding up so it minimizes the draft but is this even needed? any input is much appreciated thanks in advance!

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  2. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2010
    Forest Grove, OR
    Hi there. Here in the PNW we don't have to worry much about it getting too cold. So, do NOT close off any of your ventilation holes. You may have to even increase the ventilation if there is any condensation inside the coop when it gets cold.

    From your pictures, it looks like your birds roost below the ventilation. That's great. What you don't want is drafts blowing up their skirts, so to speak.

    I have one window in my coop that is not super sealed by any means. My girls are 4.5 years old and have been just fine in the winter.

    Don't worry. They do much better with cold than with heat!
     
  3. RonP

    RonP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Rule of average is 1 square foot of ventilation per average bird.

    You have 5 birds with less than 1/2 square foot of ventilation.
    Each 3" hole only adds 7.07 square inches of ventilation.
    To obtain 5 square feet, you would need 720 square inches, or around 101 holes [​IMG]

    I personally would look to put more draft free ventilation in the coop.
    Perhaps cutting a rectangular strip window and covering with hardware cloth.
     
  4. Chicks4fun2

    Chicks4fun2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2014
    Pacific NW
    Well, in addition to the 8 holes I have 2 windows that are 24x20 that open completely on either side of the coop that are covered with hardwire cloth. So counting the windows and the holes there is more than the one square foot per bird recommendation . However with the windows open they might as well be outside... The windows provide great ventilation in the warmer months but I was afraid it might to be chilly in the winter and was planning on keeping the windows closed....I guess I'll just keep an eye out for moisture and if I need to I'll open the windows during the day when the temps are warmer... Thanks!
     
  5. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,787
    38
    213
    Apr 15, 2010
    Forest Grove, OR
  6. Chicks4fun2

    Chicks4fun2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2014
    Pacific NW

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