Would you keep this rooster?

QChickieMama

Songster
10 Years
Oct 1, 2011
395
37
216
He's an australorp, about 1 yr old, and we've had him since he started crowing.

He matches my 5 australorp hens, so I can get full-breed chicks.

But, his 5 hens are nearly featherless on the heads from his activity.

And, when I let them free-range, he won't go back in the tractor coop on his own. He roosts on top of it, and we end up going to great lengths to get him back inside. (If we didn't have bird-dogs, I'd consider leaving him out all the time.)

He has attacked me several times, once when I was spraying Blu-Kote on one of his hens. Made sense he was protective, but even after boot to the head over and over, he continued to run at me.

And, most alarmingly, he attacked me from behind when I was just filling a feeder. I hollered (scared me silly) and kicked him as hard as I possibly could. He walked off for 5 minutes and came back but wasn't aggressive then.

So, what do you think? Is this just to be expected in a rooster?
 

davemonkey

Songster
7 Years
Nov 25, 2012
394
35
108
Liberty, TX
There are too many available Roos in the world to put up with an obnoxious one, IMHO. I would not keep him.
ETA: No, I don't think that's "normal" behavior for a GOOD Roo. It's normal for an agressive one. A good Roo should be gentle with his girls, and not so ready to attack the hand that feeds him, so to speak.
 
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Gina Maloney

In the Brooder
6 Years
Sep 12, 2013
14
0
24
I had this problem with one my roosters, I suggest not run away and have shoe ready he doesnt come after us any more I also sprayed him a gosevifvhe was charging at me it worked we have come to an understanding I rule this roost! His mean period kasted about 2-3 weeks but I can puck hin up now and he is no longer aggressive towards me. Good luck give him sometime before you give up
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,964
33,564
1,092
On the MN prairie.
Personally, I would not keep this rooster. As stated, a GOOD rooster does not attack people. That does not make him protective, it makes him aggressive. I keep chickens for eggs and meat, yes, but also for the enjoyment of it. I would not enjoy being attacked and having to watch my back every time I went outside. Another thing to think about is if you have children of your own, or young ones that live near you or may come visit. Think of the damage a rooster that size can do to a small child. (Not to mention liability issues if it's a neighbor or visiting child).
 

appps

Crowing
8 Years
Aug 29, 2012
4,784
648
321
Australia
I've had a rooster that attacked us an my boss has one that ignores you. Much as we loved ours it is so nice to go out in his yard and not constantly have one eye on the rooster at all times. We had to rehome ours anyway but just the whole chook thing has been so much more enjoyable without him.

The big red flag for me is the damage to the hens though. Ours was awful rough for about two or three weeks but then got the hang of it and settled into being a fantastic sharing and protective roo with his girls. By 1 year yours isn't likely to change his behaviour with them now.

If you are breeding them for sale its like any other unwanted trait that you don't want to pass on to the offspring.
 
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QChickieMama

Songster
10 Years
Oct 1, 2011
395
37
216
I've had a rooster that attacked us an my boss has one that ignores you. Much as we loved ours it is so nice to go out in his yard and not constantly have one eye on the rooster at all times. We had to rehome ours anyway but just the whole chook thing has been so much more enjoyable without him.

The big red flag for me is the damage to the hens though. Ours was awful rough for about two or three weeks but then got the hang of it and settled into being a fantastic sharing and protective roo with his girls. By 1 year yours isn't likely to change his behaviour with them now.

If you are breeding them for sale its like any other unwanted trait that you don't want to pass on to the offspring.

Interesting to hear that not all roos abuse their hens! I'm relieved. Is the ratio OK? 1 roo to 5 hens? I could switch things around and have 9 hens in his pen. Would that be better?
 

QChickieMama

Songster
10 Years
Oct 1, 2011
395
37
216
Personally, I would not keep this rooster. As stated, a GOOD rooster does not attack people. That does not make him protective, it makes him aggressive. I keep chickens for eggs and meat, yes, but also for the enjoyment of it. I would not enjoy being attacked and having to watch my back every time I went outside. Another thing to think about is if you have children of your own, or young ones that live near you or may come visit. Think of the damage a rooster that size can do to a small child. (Not to mention liability issues if it's a neighbor or visiting child).

How much of a good rooster is "training"? I mean, we held this guy some when he was young and sweet, but once when he came of age, he just changed 180*.

I do have a 6yo but I don't let her down by the chickens by herself now. The roo bit my hand once when I was putting kitchen scraps in his pen. Ugh. Can't have him doing that to her!
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,964
33,564
1,092
On the MN prairie.
From what I've gathered from so many posts on mean roosters, it seems that holding them and cuddling them when they are young may actually contribute to their meanness. They look at you as an equal or subordinate. A good rooster is "trained" by his keeper when the keeper reminds him that he (the keeper) is the boss of the flock. The rooster in my avatar was awesome. He always kept a respectful distance, never challenged me at any time - not when I was walking among the chickens, not when I handled his hens, not ever. Sometimes I would just walk directly toward him and he'd just turn and walk away. That's what you want. Wouldn't it be nice for your little girl to be able to go help you with chickens without you worrying about her getting attacked? Kids are good targets for mean roosters. They are more the size of the rooster, their movements are usually quicker than ours, voices more high-pitched. He could flog or spur her so fast you might not even see it coming. For her sake, I'd get rid of him.

ETA - if you do decide to keep him, it would be easier on your hens if you did switch things around so you could have 9 in with him.
 
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davemonkey

Songster
7 Years
Nov 25, 2012
394
35
108
Liberty, TX
Interesting to hear that not all roos abuse their hens! I'm relieved. Is the ratio OK? 1 roo to 5 hens? I could switch things around and have 9 hens in his pen. Would that be better?

I always read that 10 hens to a Roo is a good number. But if he pulling their feathers out, that's not going to help that aggressiveness. My Roo was just as gentle with 6 as he is now with 11 (and some young pullets coming of age soon). I had a cockerel that was about as aggressive as your Roo and the only thing that kept him from tormenting the hens was my Roo protecting them. As soon as the cockerel was big enough to eat, we ate him. Like I said, there are too many Roos in the world, people practically beg others to take them sometimes, to have to put up with an aggressive one.
 

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