Wyoming Chicken Lover!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by psimons2004, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. Feike

    Feike Chillin' With My Peeps

    191
    1
    98
    Aug 8, 2011
    Lander, Wyoming
    No not too many....State with the smallest population per square mile and it's pretty rural....I don't even think 50% have internet here!
    Nothing bad about lovely Wyoming which is an awesome and unique State....BTW I love Cody...I'm from Lander...
    Hope you'll get all the info you need....
    Welcome!
     
  2. PeepinChicken

    PeepinChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    684
    1
    103
    Mar 29, 2012
    Cody, WY
    Well all the more reason to have chickens...lol, thanks for the welcome
     
  3. WyoChickenMamma

    WyoChickenMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    698
    6
    111
    Jul 6, 2011
    So anyone hatching any? I have seven eggs under a broody right now. We have candled the last two nights and can see life in 5 of the 7. Not sure if the other two are quitters, duds or just thick dark shells that my light can't penetrate. The should hatch on the 25th. [​IMG]
     
  4. Feike

    Feike Chillin' With My Peeps

    191
    1
    98
    Aug 8, 2011
    Lander, Wyoming
    42 Eggs in the incubator at the Nursing Home I work at.....Welsummers, Splash and FBCM's, EE's, OE's and Banties...
    We are a little too early to candle though...
     
  5. clucking cuties

    clucking cuties Chillin' With My Peeps

    100
    4
    81
    Apr 30, 2012
    Hello to those neighbors in Wyoming and surrounding areas. We are north of Cheyenne, Wyoming.

    Our older birds are buff Orphington, Easter eggers, and a few Wyandotte's (silver laced) and Australorps all from the feed store early this spring.

    We are now hatching fools due to the unprecedented interest of my 12-year-old "chicken crazy" son in; chickens, chicken genetics, pretty colors, and delicious eggs. We hatched a bunch of Black Copper Marans, and out of the first 10, I think 4-5 may be pullets[​IMG]. Out of the next 25 or so, I am not at all sure yet but will certainly have a bunch of extra roos.

    I currently have 10 Blue Copper Marans and about 30 Ameraucana eggs in the bators. We also have lavender, black, and blue Orpington eggs in the bators. [​IMG][​IMG]

    Lavender Orphington, Lemon Cuckoo Orpington, and a few cream Legbar eggs are on the way.

    We are interested in having mainly Orphingtons, Marans and blue-green egg layers of any variety but especially Ameraucanas. I plan to maintain the adult flocks of around 12-14 laying hens of each variety and a few breeding roosters.

    We are getting a bit better at high-altitude hatching, (6200 feet)[​IMG]and also having lot of fun with this.
    We are studying life science this semester (we home school), and I have used the genetics of chicken coloration, and the "quitters in the bator" to teach both a bit basic genetics and embryology. Mainly, however, we just love chickens, and nothing is cuter or sweeter than baby chicks. My husband has the barbeque grill all warmed up and is waiting for any "culls" from the flock, although I would rather give (sell at cost?) the nicer birds that we do not keep to others who love raising chickens.
    Any questions, comments, or friendships are always welcome.[​IMG]
     
  6. WyoChickenMamma

    WyoChickenMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    698
    6
    111
    Jul 6, 2011
    What are you doing different for high altitude hatching...I never even considered there would be a difference.
     
  7. clucking cuties

    clucking cuties Chillin' With My Peeps

    100
    4
    81
    Apr 30, 2012
    We found that we must must must remove all of the air plugs for better air circulation. I think that we are doing better with the fans, rather than still air to bring in more oxygen, although I use still air for lockdown, but then open a few extra holes for vents and add water soaked sponges in the corners to get the humidity to target. I cut the humidity quite a bit,(30-40% maximum-incubation 55-65% maximum for lockdown.) I think that the chicks drown more easliy at high altitiude, as the O2 saturation is already lower. We are still learning though and far from perfect.
     
  8. WyoChickenMamma

    WyoChickenMamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    698
    6
    111
    Jul 6, 2011
    I am glad you posted this, I was just reading about some articles I found after you mentioned that. I have shipped eggs coming soon, Cream Legbars and FBCM. As you know, both expensive eggs. I am in Casper, I think we are about 6500 feet...don't want to drown my babies.


    I have eggs in my incubator that are hatching right now, they are for my neighbor and came from her flock...so there should be no issue there....What I was reading was that if they are laid at sea level and then are shipped to high alt. you have the problems.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2012
  9. clucking cuties

    clucking cuties Chillin' With My Peeps

    100
    4
    81
    Apr 30, 2012
    I actually think that it might be a problem, with the hens laying at low altitude and then trying to hatch the eggs at high altitude. There isn't much we can do about that, as there seem to me more chicken breeders at lower altitudes, and probably for good reason. I do think that the humidity issue is less forgiving at high altitude. I have heard of people running oxygen into the incubator, (similar to people who use it at night for COPD and other respiratory problems) but I think it would be easy to get too much oxygen. Perhaps chicks could get retinopathy, (similar to premature babies who get too much oxygen) and the oxygen would also be a fire hazard, so I have crossed that off of my "to try" list (for now anyway[​IMG]). Hatching shipped eggs is pretty much a crapshoot anyway with so many variables and so many things that can happen to them in transit.

    Good luck with your hatch.[​IMG]
     
  10. clucking cuties

    clucking cuties Chillin' With My Peeps

    100
    4
    81
    Apr 30, 2012
    I did find this article which states the following:

    "Eggs produced at sea level: hatchery at altitude (1000 - 2000 meters)

    Of the three scenarios, this is the least desirable because it will definitely result in reduced hatchability. Eggs produced at sea level have a relatively large effective pore area and will therefore lose more water at higher altitudes. To compensate, setters and hatchers should be operated at a higher relative humidity. This is best achieved by pre-conditioning the inlet air to a relative humidity of 75 per cent, with a temperature of 24 - 28°C (optimum). At the same time, increase the ventilation rate from normal for sea level, to accommodate the reduced oxygen levels."

    http://www.pasreform.com/academy/fr...cubation/25-incubation-at-high-altitudes.html

    It did seem like my eggs hatched better when the humidity was not quite at 75% but closer to 60-65%, and I had more live hatches. This was with mainly Marans eggs, which are said to have harder shells and less porosity. I am still experimenting with the humidity with the other breeds and am by no means an expert.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by