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Yogurt but no calcium in grit??????

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by NJbirdlover, May 15, 2009.

  1. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quick question~~

    Why is grit w/ calcium a no-no but yogurt as a treat encouraged?

    I understand that the active cultures are good for their digestive tracts-is this the only reason?
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2009
  2. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *BUMP*
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I think this is an excellent question and do not really have an answer for you. I'm sure you are aware that excessive calcium can harm a growing chicks internal organ. I can never remember if it is kidneys or liver.

    A chick raised outside will get calcium from the bugs it eats, some plants, and, if it is in limestone country, from the grit it eats. It obviously has to have some calcium for bone development but too much is supposedly bad.

    I'm guessing, but I'd suspect it gets some calcium from yogurt but a more concentrated form in oyster shell. And yogurt, like any treat, should form a small part of any chicks diet.

    Hope someone that knows better responds.
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Calcium in grit works like a calcium supplement. There is not enough calcium in the small amount of yogurt given for a treat to worry about. But even a small amount of yogurt provides good intestinal flora, as they multiply after ingested.
     
  5. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Not sure why anyone would give yogurt as a treat, but it won`t hurt. The main reason to feed a small amt of yogurt is to replace enzymes killed off by antibiotics.

    Also, not sure why grit with calcium isn`t good. Not needed of course, but must have something to do with rapid growth and leg problems in meat birds. Just guessing, but if you have a better idea, I`m listening........Pop
     
  6. lovin'mychicks

    lovin'mychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not sure, but looks like from a chemistry stand point it has to do with the concentration/absorption rate. It would seem that the calcium in yogurt would be minimal when compared to that in the grit. I only give yogurt to my older pullets and laying hens as I am never 100% sure what then encounter when free ranging, but I know what my new hatches eat until they leave the brooder. So, I am not that worried about too much calcium.

    BTW, are we talking about grit that you put out for your chickens or naturally occurring grit. We do not add grit to our chicken's diet as they free range during the day so I assume they get what they need, is this a bad assumption??
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:I've seen several posts where excessive calcium can cause damage to one of the organs to a young growing chick, kidneys I think but it could be the liver. Once they have quit growing it is not supposed to be a problem. I think the key is in "excessive".
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:I've seen several posts where excessive calcium can cause damage to one of the organs to a young growing chick, kidneys I think but it could be the liver. Once they have quit growing it is not supposed to be a problem. I think the key is in "excessive".

    I agree the key is in excessive. I offered small amounts of yogurt when my chicks were little. Sure they got a little calcium from it, but they also got lots of healthy bacteria.
    Now that my chickens are grown they go thru a couple of pints of yogurt a week.
     
  9. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Salem County, NJ
    lovin'mychicks :

    Not sure, but looks like from a chemistry stand point it has to do with the concentration/absorption rate. It would seem that the calcium in yogurt would be minimal when compared to that in the grit. I only give yogurt to my older pullets and laying hens as I am never 100% sure what then encounter when free ranging, but I know what my new hatches eat until they leave the brooder. So, I am not that worried about too much calcium.

    BTW, are we talking about grit that you put out for your chickens or naturally occurring grit. We do not add grit to our chicken's diet as they free range during the day so I assume they get what they need, is this a bad assumption??

    Grit for chicks still in brooder. [​IMG]

    thanks for all of the responses!​
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2009

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