Younger chickens sitting most of the day

Kiki

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6 Years
Jul 31, 2015
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Anything that you feed besides the complete balanced feed takes away from them getting a complete balanced diet.
Whatever you want to offer besides the complete balanced feed needs to be a small amount and not daily.
 

lunahills

Chirping
May 20, 2021
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Shenandoah Valley, VA
Anything that you feed besides the complete balanced feed takes away from them getting a complete balanced diet.
Whatever you want to offer besides the complete balanced feed needs to be a small amount and not daily.
Thank you for all your feedback and help, it’s much appreciated!
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
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Is scratch not necessary at all? As a complete newbie I read so much conflicting information. It was my initial belief that their feed would contain everything they need, like feeding a quality kibble to my dogs. But then I read that chickens need scratch to help digest their food. Also read that some fresh herbs are good for keeping parasites at bay. And then there are all of the ideas about giving them hanging veggies and such to keep them occupied.
Not sure where you're getting your info from.

Scratch is the equivalent of chicken candy - it's fine in moderation, as a treat or for training, but it's not nutritionally balanced like their feed is.

GRIT are rocks that chickens ingest to help with digestion, as they have no teeth and cannot chew.

Using hanging veggies to keep them occupied is ok, but I personally prefer non-edible entertainment - roosts, piles of leaves or other plant material to dig around in, clutter/obstacles to climb on or go under or around, a nice dust bath. Yes my birds get the occasional veggie treat, as I garden, but it's a bonus and not something I rely on to keep them busy.
 

Artichoke Lover

Free Ranging
Jul 27, 2020
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Grit is usually provided in a small separate container. The same way you’d put out oyster shell. Generally they will take what they need.
I agree with Kiki to stop scraps and snacks until they are completely well and I usually don’t start giving it at all until they are fully grown. About 16 weeks old.
Im also thinking it would be a good idea to treat for coccidia again since you are still seeing blood. What food are they eating? Is it medicated?
 

lunahills

Chirping
May 20, 2021
60
104
81
Shenandoah Valley, VA
Grit is usually provided in a small separate container. The same way you’d put out oyster shell. Generally they will take what they need.
I agree with Kiki to stop scraps and snacks until they are completely well and I usually don’t start giving it at all until they are fully grown. About 16 weeks old.
Im also thinking it would be a good idea to treat for coccidia again since you are still seeing blood. What food are they eating? Is it medicated?
Their food isn’t medicated, it’s Nature’s Best organic chick starter. If I treat again do I start over with the 2 tsp per gallon dosage, or a lower dose? Also should I toss their eggs while they’re being treated?
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
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Their food isn’t medicated, it’s Nature’s Best organic chick starter. If I treat again do I start over with the 2 tsp per gallon dosage, or a lower dose? Also should I toss their eggs while they’re being treated?
No egg withdrawl for amprolium use. If there's still blood and/or lethargy I think a full strength treatment would be best to ensure you kill it off for good.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
18,205
36,949
1,062
WA, Pac NW
My Coop
My Coop

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