A question about how to train our Rooster.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by colincrompton, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. colincrompton

    colincrompton Out Of The Brooder

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    I've been using the method listed here https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/dealing-with-roosters-roo-behavior which is to him him up for 1/2 an hour after he attacks. I'm curious if I hold him upside down and the spray him with a hose every time he attacks, would that make him less aggressive?

    EDIT: We do not want to cull him if we can avoid it!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2013
  2. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it's a good idea to be disciplinary without being abusive. The point is to establish dominance, not to torture him. [​IMG]
     
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  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If your rooster has attacked you enough times you're wanting to change methods, you need to cull him. Life's too short to keep a mean rooster. Rationalizing it by saying he's just protecting his flock is bs. Animals do not attack humans and live, period.
     
  4. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    YES! That too.
     
  5. Triple Willow

    Triple Willow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A whole lot of people don't want to hear this BUT the reason that roosters usually end up attacking humans is because they were handled and petted from the time they were hatched. When you handle and pet them they lose their fear of people. That is fine and cute UNTIL they start to reach sexual maturity then they change into a whole different bird. They have raging hormones and along with that comes the attacks. If you want to have a good rooster for your flock, do not try to make a pet out of it. Make the hens pets if you want to, but not the roosters. When they are small many times it is next to impossible to tell a pullet from a cockrel. In that case I don't pet any of them because I don't want to ruin a possible good rooster, sentencing him to the crock pot. You can make pets out of the hens after you are sure who the roosters are.

    Of course there are exceptions to this but you can see dozens of people on this website talking about the same problem. I have also seen roosters that were mean without ever being petted. I would cull him and start all over with a good adult rooster or raise another one and not pet it.
     
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  6. colincrompton

    colincrompton Out Of The Brooder

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    Well the thing is, my friend Ben does something similar and his rooster dosn't even get close.
     
  7. Nutcase

    Nutcase Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've seen this method multiple times on BYC and I disagree with it, whether or not people are getting good results. It sounds cruel, and a rooster who becomes submissive after using this method has been unnecessarily frightened into it, even tortured. If your bird is so aggressive that you resort to things like that, it's time for him to hit the freezer. I'm sorry to have to say that, but a mean rooster is not worth it. If you haven't already tried this, you should (it is from the same article in your initial post):

    (1) At the first sign of aggression grab your rooster up and hold him no matter how much he kicks, screams and protests. DO NOT PUT HIM DOWN! Walk around with him, do chores while holding him or whatever, let him calm down and stay that way for 15-30 minutes until he has settled. Then at your discretion you can put him down. If he kicks, screams or squawks while you are releasing him, pick him up and repeat this cycle until he submits to you, and will walk off peacefully when you let him down. Do this every time he shows aggression, repeat as needed. If after 3 weeks of doing this every day his behavior is still the same, proceed to the next level.

    This is a much kinder way to show who's boss. Sometimes, showing that you're not a threat can make a bigger difference than showing that you are something to be feared. If the rooster thinks you are a threat because of what you did to him, he's likely to be even more aggressive. It's possible to be respected without being feared!

    Hope I helped [​IMG] and good luck.
     

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