Adding a new chick to the flock

Birdwatcher804

Chirping
Apr 24, 2017
98
77
91
East Tennessee
I purchased a 3-week-old Cream Legbar pullet from a breeder, yesterday afternoon. Once I got her home, I noticed her breathing seemed to be a little labored, and she acted like she didn't want to move much. She responds to touch and becomes vocal when I pick her up. I gave her some feed and water with electrolytes and probiotics. She is chirping contently and her eating and drinking seems normal. She is not gasping for air and is pooping normally. How long should I wait, to know for sure that she is not sick, to introduce her to my 7 2-week-old chicks, who are at least twice her size?
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,733
34,196
1,122
Colorado Rockies
Was this breeder a private breeder? If so, are they NPIP certified? If you don't know, call them and ask. It's a program that inspects and certifies poultry breeders and hatcheries to insure serious poultry disease isn't spread around the country.

This certification should give you pretty good assurance the chicks they sell you will not be carrying disease. If they are not NPIP certified, you take a chance that you could be importing serious poultry diseases into your flock. Quarantine does nothing to safeguard your existing flock against these more serious viruses.

Here on BYC, I've directly participated in a thread where new chicks bought from a private breeder were carrying one of these contagious viruses (Marek's). All of the chicks died and contaminated the premises making it difficult for our original poster to have more chickens since this disease and many like it live a long time in the environment, sometimes years.

The OP called the authorities and they found some pretty serious violations, and the breeder was shut down. This tragedy could have been avoided by asking the simple question, "are you NPIP certified?"

This is even more important than quarantine. Call and ask. Meanwhile, take precautions such as hand washing and changing clothes when handling your existing chickens after handling this new chick.
 

Birdwatcher804

Chirping
Apr 24, 2017
98
77
91
East Tennessee
Was this breeder a private breeder? If so, are they NPIP certified? If you don't know, call them and ask. It's a program that inspects and certifies poultry breeders and hatcheries to insure serious poultry disease isn't spread around the country.

This certification should give you pretty good assurance the chicks they sell you will not be carrying disease. If they are not NPIP certified, you take a chance that you could be importing serious poultry diseases into your flock. Quarantine does nothing to safeguard your existing flock against these more serious viruses.

Here on BYC, I've directly participated in a thread where new chicks bought from a private breeder were carrying one of these contagious viruses (Marek's). All of the chicks died and contaminated the premises making it difficult for our original poster to have more chickens since this disease and many like it live a long time in the environment, sometimes years.

The OP called the authorities and they found some pretty serious violations, and the breeder was shut down. This tragedy could have been avoided by asking the simple question, "are you NPIP certified?"

This is even more important than quarantine. Call and ask. Meanwhile, take precautions such as hand washing and changing clothes when handling your existing chickens after handling this new chick.
I am a newbie and, unfortunately did not ask. I will call her in the morning and check. I have been washing my hands and changing my clothes, and my chicks have been vaccinated for Marek's. If she is not NPIP certified, should I return the chick?
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
23,733
34,196
1,122
Colorado Rockies
Marek's isn't the only virus. Others have no vaccination, no cures. My flock carries one of these, worse than Marek's, and the heart ache is indescribable.

Return the chick if this breeder is not NPIP certified.
 

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