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adding chicks

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by NeeCee51, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. NeeCee51

    NeeCee51 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 12, 2013
    I need some advice on adding chicks to my current one year old Light Sussex rooster and three light Sussex hens. I would like to get some Rhode Island Reds. My question is should I get three hens or a rooster and three hens. Also what is the best process to introduce them to my current babies. I know not to do it when they are babies but not sure as to when and how to do it. Any advice would be very welcome..thanks
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Unless you will be housing them in separate quarters, sorted by breed, you will not have a flock that can support two roosters - if the birds will all be housed together you will want to get pullet chicks only.
    As for integrating the new birds, you will want to brood the new babies separately until they are a good size (12-14 weeks) - then start housing them so that both groups can see each other, but not have physical interaction (ie side-by-side enclosures, a temporary enclosure within your current one, etc) for a couple of weeks - then allow mingling. You want your new girls to be mature enough to handle the attentions of your rooster when the mingling is allowed.
     
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Good advice here. Not only will your flock not support two roosters, you will most likely have fighting as the two males work things out to establish dominance - especially if you add another mature rooster. Once they get things settled, it does not mean they will stay that way. Occasionally, a subordinate rooster will take on the dominant one just to make sure things haven't changed. Sometimes rooster fights can be to the death.

    Housing them in an look but don't touch arrangement can help, but don't be surprised if there are still squabbles to establish pecking order once they're all together.
     
  4. NeeCee51

    NeeCee51 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much, that really answers my questions about a second rooster. The one I have is pretty watchful as to what or who gets too close. He's a good protector. I think I will just go with hens..Rooster might like more ladies..
     

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