Advice Needed On The Use Of Sulfadimethoxine

Spartan22

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5 Years
Sep 2, 2014
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@newhobbie & @Larry6 am glad someone's post was helpful to somebody 7 months later
I love the fact of people helping each other on this site.
 

Mtnldy's Gurlz

Hatching
9 Years
Oct 30, 2010
6
0
6
I appreciate your post too, newhobbie. Did your vet give you the amount to administer for a gallon of water? I'm twisting my brain into knots trying to figure out what the instructions on the package mean.
 

casportpony

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I appreciate your post too, newhobbie. Did your vet give you the amount to administer for a gallon of water? I'm twisting my brain into knots trying to figure out what the instructions on the package mean.
@Mtnldy's Gurlz
Welcome to BYC!

Which one do you have? If it's the package that is 107 grams, and the active ingredient is Sulfadimethoxine (look carefully, a there is a similar one called sulfamethazine), I think the dose is supposed to be one teaspoon per gallon.

-Kathy
 
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Mtnldy's Gurlz

Hatching
9 Years
Oct 30, 2010
6
0
6
Thank you, Kathy. I ended up using a half of a teaspoon to a gallon of water, and she drank it up like crazy, but died anyway the next day. I get discouraged when I try to nurse and doctor them myself and they die anyway, but I can't just sit by and watch. Afterwards, I second guess myself and think of different things I could have tried, but then I start to feel as if I've over doctored them to death. She was my favorite out of fourteen, but I'll get over it, and I love them all.

Thanks,
Mtnlady (Hannah)
 

sondaddyfarm

In the Brooder
May 20, 2018
7
9
14
I know this is an older thread but our vet just prescribed it to our entire flock after a farm visit which at the time had everywhere from a ouple week old chick to hens laying fertile eggs and pullets and everything inbetween. I forgot to ask egg withdrawal though that's why I came across this thread.
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
10 Years
Nov 12, 2009
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western South Dakota
Being it is an old thread, I will comment.

I would cull any bird this sick. I do not treat my birds with any medicine. One needs to be very careful with drugs, and guessing and by golly, is not a good idea. You have healthier flocks if you do not treat with medicine.

Feed well, clean water, no herbal remedies, no weird things in water, ample space and healthy birds. Keep unhealthy birds out of your flock, ASAP.
 

casportpony

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I know this is an older thread but our vet just prescribed it to our entire flock after a farm visit which at the time had everywhere from a ouple week old chick to hens laying fertile eggs and pullets and everything inbetween. I forgot to ask egg withdrawal though that's why I came across this thread.
I think most people wait two weeks, but call your vet and double check. If your vet doesn't know they can contact FARAD for you:

Good luck and I hope your flock gets better soon. :hugs
 

MaevesFLock

Hatching
Feb 14, 2020
3
4
3
After an outbreak in my flock I have been looking around for information about Sulfadimethoxine use in hens over 16 weeks. The packaging says it should not be used on them, however there are research papers online that shed light on residual antibiotics in eggs. Here is the one I found that seems to be very clear on the withdrawal time and use in adult hens:

"Sulphonamide residues in eggs following drug administration via the drinking water.
Roudaut B1, Garnier M.
Author information

Abstract

The aim was to determine concentrations of sulphadimidine (SDM) and sulphadimethoxine (SDT) in eggs following oral administration through drinking water for 5 days (0.5 g l(-1) for SDT, 1 and 2 g l(-1) for SDM). Residues of sulphonamides in albumen and yolk were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The limit of quantification was 0.005 microg g(-1) for the two egg components. The results indicate that 0.9-1.4% of the dose administered was deposited in eggs. Maximum concentrations in albumen were much higher than those in yolk. More than 75% of the overall sulphonamides detected in eggs was concentrated in the albumen. The residue levels declined below the limit of quantification within 12-20 days for albumen and 14-15 days for yolk after treatment was discontinued.
PMID: 11962695 DOI: 10.1080/02652030110102836"

So 21 days would be the amount of time not to eat eggs, and your hen's eggs should be safe to eat after. Google scholar is a GREAT resource for looking at real research - type "Scholar" into the Google search bar, search on the topic, and then when you see a title that seems relevant, read the abstract and the results sections - that is where they summarize the findings.
 

casportpony

🦆🦚Enlightened🦚🦆
Project manager
Premium member
7 Years
Jun 24, 2012
88,297
168,291
1,912
After an outbreak in my flock I have been looking around for information about Sulfadimethoxine use in hens over 16 weeks. The packaging says it should not be used on them, however there are research papers online that shed light on residual antibiotics in eggs. Here is the one I found that seems to be very clear on the withdrawal time and use in adult hens:

"Sulphonamide residues in eggs following drug administration via the drinking water.
Roudaut B1, Garnier M.
Author information

Abstract

The aim was to determine concentrations of sulphadimidine (SDM) and sulphadimethoxine (SDT) in eggs following oral administration through drinking water for 5 days (0.5 g l(-1) for SDT, 1 and 2 g l(-1) for SDM). Residues of sulphonamides in albumen and yolk were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The limit of quantification was 0.005 microg g(-1) for the two egg components. The results indicate that 0.9-1.4% of the dose administered was deposited in eggs. Maximum concentrations in albumen were much higher than those in yolk. More than 75% of the overall sulphonamides detected in eggs was concentrated in the albumen. The residue levels declined below the limit of quantification within 12-20 days for albumen and 14-15 days for yolk after treatment was discontinued.
PMID: 11962695 DOI: 10.1080/02652030110102836"

So 21 days would be the amount of time not to eat eggs, and your hen's eggs should be safe to eat after. Google scholar is a GREAT resource for looking at real research - type "Scholar" into the Google search bar, search on the topic, and then when you see a title that seems relevant, read the abstract and the results sections - that is where they summarize the findings.
Welcome to BYC @MaevesFLock, excellent find there!:bow
 
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