Aggressive Rooster

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
read my post again. Do NOT do his job. You can help him do his job and he will take credit for it. You bring the feed, water, treats, let them out or in of coop/run WITHOUT him telling the ladys first and he has to come at you.
Doing this is the best way to keep a rooster settled. A rooster will defend his flock from danger and other roosters. Don't be a rooster in his eyes.
I thank you for your earnest advice. The rooster I spoke of in this thread was a silent attacker and would blindside me without warning. As much as I knew there was a rooster reason for his behavior, I couldn't have him attack me every time I entered my flock's space. The rooster I still have has issues with me too, but he so far has only run close behind me. He bumped my leg once but he hasn't done the full force both feet plant into my legs or back. As soon as I enter their area, my flock comes running to me. Of course my rooster does not like this. I am trying some different methods with him because I want to keep him. He is a very good guardian of the girls. When I enter their area with my feed container, I walk a few steps then throw some out on the ground so all have something right away a distance from me. This worked well one morning. However, no matter what I'm doing in their area, they gather round me and follow me. I know my rooster doesn't like this, but I cannot control it. He doesn't seem to care if I sit down and they gather round me for attention. He doesn't come after me inside the coop either. It's just when I'm walking to and from the feeding/watering area and most often when I'm leaving. As I said, I'm going to try various things to keep him from getting worse because I really like and respect him. But, I cannot provide feed and water in a way that allows him to believe he found it first. When I feed and water, he is one of the flock and he needs to behave.
 

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
So sorry to hear that :( Maybe next time if you want a nice rooster, try a gentle breed like a welsummer. They grow nice and big and mine Protected my flock from 3 vicious dogs. And he was nice and tame. But it’s up to you of course.
Thank you for that advice. I still have one of my roosters. He is a Barred Rock. He's somewhat aggressive, but not yet scarey. If I have to remove him too, I'll definitely keep your breed suggestion in mind.
 

RDchicken99

Songster
Mar 14, 2021
102
111
111
I’m going through the same issue. I have a beautiful welsummer cockerel who loves his girls, but he’s gotten too aggressive IMHO. He decided to try and flog my face the other day, and the only way you can get him to stop is by bonking him on the head. You can’t turn your back on him nowadays. He’s gonna go to freezer camp soon.
 

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,340
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southern Michigan
Some breeds tend to have more 'difficult' roosters than others, although all are individuals.
Try raising some new cockerels next spring, and hopefully there will be at least one 'keeper' in the group. I think that cockerels raised in a mixed age flock have a better chance to behave, having had humbling experiences with hens and maybe an adult rooster. Not always though, it's still individual.
So far, all our Cackle white Chantecler cock birds have been polite, and our Salmon Favorelle was a saint. The SFs are so mild mannered, they may fet picked on by other flock members though.
We have also had nice French Marans cockerels, but not many, so can't speak about them as a group.
Mary
 

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
Our one Roo is for a lack of a better word an asshole. He attacks me,my husband, the pitbull..the other roo is a timid jerk. He pretends to be big and bad if you puff your coat up or arms out he runs! Not the banta i named Chicken boo. ( i sing the song everytime i see him strutting around the yard. ( he not man he a chicken boo). To go back on topic this morning i ended hitting chicken boo with the feed scoop as he lunged at me. He shook it off and lunged at me again. I was dressed for work so i didn't want my outfit full of chicken paw prints.. i inherited these chickens. I don't want to have to butcher Boo but this agression is getting crazy
I'm thinking these animals have to be manageable. Yes they are acting on instinct and I respect that, but since I am their primary source of food, they better back off. A little show of dominance is acceptable, but full on aggression could result in injury. That's no good and not worth keeping them. The way I see it, they've challenged their perceived adversary and lost.
 

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
I’m going through the same issue. I have a beautiful welsummer cockerel who loves his girls, but he’s gotten too aggressive IMHO. He decided to try and flog my face the other day, and the only way you can get him to stop is by bonking him on the head. You can’t turn your back on him nowadays. He’s gonna go to freezer camp soon.
Oh boy! In your face even! WOW! And attacks from behind! Nope, not worth it. Challenge met, you lose Mr. Rooster. It's a sad moment, but from my perspective cannot be avoided. I was just told welsummer roosters are gentle. Hmmm...just goes to show a rooster is a rooster. Those who are fortunate to get a gentleman are oh so fortunate indeed! Maybe I'll happen onto one someday!
 

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
Some breeds tend to have more 'difficult' roosters than others, although all are individuals.
Try raising some new cockerels next spring, and hopefully there will be at least one 'keeper' in the group. I think that cockerels raised in a mixed age flock have a better chance to behave, having had humbling experiences with hens and maybe an adult rooster. Not always though, it's still individual.
So far, all our Cackle white Chantecler cock birds have been polite, and our Salmon Favorelle was a saint. The SFs are so mild mannered, they may fet picked on by other flock members though.
We have also had nice French Marans cockerels, but not many, so can't speak about them as a group.
Mary
Thank you so much for those great breed selections. And to grow out several cockerels together or in an older mixed flock. I'm so envious of the photos and accounts of folks with their beloved rooster nestled in their arms.
 

Boomerwaffen

Chirping
Jun 28, 2021
78
110
86
Our one Roo is for a lack of a better word an asshole. He attacks me,my husband, the pitbull..the other roo is a timid jerk. He pretends to be big and bad if you puff your coat up or arms out he runs! Not the banta i named Chicken boo. ( i sing the song everytime i see him strutting around the yard. ( he not man he a chicken boo). To go back on topic this morning i ended hitting chicken boo with the feed scoop as he lunged at me. He shook it off and lunged at me again. I was dressed for work so i didn't want my outfit full of chicken paw prints.. i inherited these chickens. I don't want to have to butcher Boo but this agression is getting crazy
Grab him and hold him face down on the ground and stroke his neck softly for a minute. This worked for me with our rooster Lamar. He then later went after our son who just gave him the boot and Lamar ran off. It’s a dominance thing with roosters. Just as is the pecking order with hens. Perfectly natural. They can be trained. But you have to grab them whenever they’re being aggressive. For really aggressive roosters if the first thing doesn’t work, carry them around the coop and yard for a minute or two in front of the other birds. Hilariously after I held Lamar down, most of the hens have come over to me and displayed submission. While weird it shows clearly that establishing a hierarchy is part of the chicken DNA.
 

Jerisflock

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Sep 3, 2021
36
149
74
Cuba, IL
I was attacked yesterday by our nearly 6 month old Black Orpington named Lamar (a GTA5 character our son named him after). Like the video game Lamar tried his hand at assault on the back of my legs yesterday as I turned to leave the coop. I grabbed Lamar and held him face down on the ground and spoke softly to him and strokes his head and neck softly, holding him firmly down. All the other birds especially the 12 hens made a semi-circle in front of Lamar a few inches away watching Lamar get the treatment. I went in the coop today and no attack and Lamar acted calmly but avoided me as he has done since he was a chick. I will try this again if it continues more than once more, I’ll grab Lamar and hold him by his feet and walk around with him in the coop for a minute or two. There can be no doubt in your rooster’s mind that you are not only the kind giant that brings him food you’re the boss not him. We have a large Embden gander named Fat Tony (pictured in back) that doesn’t take Lamar’s crap either. So Lamar started trying to dominate our drake and then I guess he decided to have a go at me. Interestingly he’s never tried it on my wife. She’s Thai and she said they just smack them (not to hurt but to stun) aggressive roosters and don’t have any problems with them.
What an interesting story! I would never have thought of trying either of those moves! I'm not sure I could catch my Barred Rock rooster. They have a large area to run, and I'm kind of small.
 

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