Albino plants ... ????

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by erinszoo, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. erinszoo

    erinszoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 28, 2011
    North Central Oklahoma
    This is a plant that has come up along with my winter squash. It is identical to the other winter squash except it is albino or blonde. I thought that it would turn green once it was exposed to the light and sun but we've had it under grow lights and even the first true leaves are setting on the same color. Has anyone ever had this happen before? Will the plant produce albino fruit? I'm guessing it's a genetic condition and not a cross breeding problem because I've never seen a plant that was yellowish-white-ish before. I'm really interested in the scientific side of this and in getting fruit from it to see if the seeds produce the same thing or not. Not sure how a yellow plant can function since the green coloring is what signifies the presence of chlorophyll. Any ideas anyone?

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  2. americana-lover

    americana-lover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it looks cool white! [​IMG]
     
  3. Quail lover

    Quail lover Out Of The Brooder

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    The DNA of the plant has a fault, making the plant albino. I wouldn't worry about it...
     
  4. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sunny side up :)
    Usually if a plant is pure white it will most likely eventually die unless it is attached to the mother plant via a corm or tuber (as in the case of bananas etc). If it has no green or other color besides white at all it usually can't make chloropyll.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  5. erinszoo

    erinszoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Central Oklahoma
    Well decided it must not be totally albino because it's still alive after three weeks. The true leaf that was forming has some green tinting to it now. It has definitely slowed down in growth compared to its neighbors in the same pot. Still interesting.
     
  6. chickenwings

    chickenwings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sometimes the lack of pigment can be cause by a virus, as it is with many variegated plants. (They are often not contagious unless there is direct contact such as grafting)
     
  7. denasfarm

    denasfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sweet Home Alabama!!
    I had an Albino Pinkeye purple hull pea and several albino corn plants out of truckers fav. I think I uploaded the pics to Photo bucket if not I lost them when the computer crashed. I shall look.



    Here we go...Peas

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    and corn

    [​IMG]

    Neither lived....
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  8. fairoza

    fairoza New Egg

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    the plant is not likely to produce food as there is no chlorophyll and cannot produce photosynthesis. when the plant cannot produce food for itself it will not survive for long (scientifically proved) unless it is attached to its parent plant where it gets all the necessary nutrients from its parent plant. hope you understood ..
    THANK YOU
     
  9. fairoza

    fairoza New Egg

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    Oct 2, 2013
    the plant is not likely to produce food as there is no chlorophyll and cannot produce photosynthesis. when the plant cannot produce food for itself it will not survive for long (scientifically proved) unless it is attached to its parent plant where it gets all the necessary nutrients from its parent plant. hope you understood ..
    THANK YOU
     

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