Am I creating a mean rooster? Or is it 50/50?

esme13

Songster
7 Years
Apr 22, 2014
513
281
211
New York
I have my chicks that was hatched. Right away I knew one was a rooster. He’s only two weeks old. He was so noisy in the beginning so I named him brutest the rudest.

However I’ve noticed him being very friendly to us. He steps up, onto the hands and like to perch on the arm. Very polite and jumps off to do his business. He does hold his body high all the time and proudly stands tall.

My question is , will this condition him to over run us and not have fear? Am I creating a dominant roo? I know hormones haven’t started. He is a hatchery chick that I hatched a black astroloup. I don’t know if the breed plays a difference?
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,178
38,230
1,096
southern Michigan
There's no one right answer for this.
I don't make pets of my cockerels, i want them to respect my space and keep some distance away from me. Everyone doesn't feel that way about them, and some folks have very social roosters who aren't human aggressive at all.
In my experience though, the 'friendly' cockerels are actually bold, and my not respect your space as they mature. If you have only young birds, with no adults to teach them good manners, that can make a difference too.
As a new chicken owner, you may not see early signs of difficult behavior until things get out of hand.
Human aggression is both genetic and influenced by management, and each cockerel of any breed could go either way. generally Australorps have a good reputation, but that's not a sure thing.
Mary
 

esme13

Songster
7 Years
Apr 22, 2014
513
281
211
New York
There's no one right answer for this.
I don't make pets of my cockerels, i want them to respect my space and keep some distance away from me. Everyone doesn't feel that way about them, and some folks have very social roosters who aren't human aggressive at all.
In my experience though, the 'friendly' cockerels are actually bold, and my not respect your space as they mature. If you have only young birds, with no adults to teach them good manners, that can make a difference too.
As a new chicken owner, you may not see early signs of difficult behavior until things get out of hand.
Human aggression is both genetic and influenced by management, and each cockerel of any breed could go either way. generally Australorps have a good reputation, but that's not a sure thing.
Mary

thank you, i hope genetics plays a positive factor for him. Other wise he will be dinner. I have an older dominant hen In my coop, hopefully she will be a good leader for him.

I have just never had a rooster. So of course I have my reservation on what I’m seeing as to weather this might be a good thing or a regretful out come.

what could potentially be some early signs to watch out for? Just so I’m aware?
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
17,692
138,604
1,582
Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
My Coop
I have my chicks that was hatched. Right away I knew one was a rooster. He’s only two weeks old. He was so noisy in the beginning so I named him brutest the rudest.

However I’ve noticed him being very friendly to us. He steps up, onto the hands and like to perch on the arm. Very polite and jumps off to do his business. He does hold his body high all the time and proudly stands tall.

My question is , will this condition him to over run us and not have fear? Am I creating a dominant roo? I know hormones haven’t started. He is a hatchery chick that I hatched a black astroloup. I don’t know if the breed plays a difference?
I've found that cockerels are much more friendly while young than hens. It's a major problem because who doesn't like a friendly cuddly young cockerel. Unfortunately this changes as they mature and if you are not aware of it and don't see it coming it is very easy to end up with a human aggressive rooster.
The basis of the change seems to be the transition from the hens being yours, or even nobodies in particular, to his. It is very difficult to drum into people just how seriously most roosters view the 'they're my hens now' change.
I wrote an article that tries to help people understand a bit about rooster behaviour. It's not a how to type article, but it may help you to understand why you have a problem if you do. If you can work out why, you can usually work out what to do about it.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/understanding-your-rooster.75056/
 

esme13

Songster
7 Years
Apr 22, 2014
513
281
211
New York
Thank you all , it’s a lot to. catch up on reading :). It seems lots of behavior to watch out for. I am hoping he grows up to just be respectful. I don’t need a cuddle bug :) just one to watch the flock. He does make me laugh at his antics. He is not like my girls, seems to love the attention.
 

esme13

Songster
7 Years
Apr 22, 2014
513
281
211
New York
This is the little stinker, he constantly just wants to sit. My husband said he is trying to get the tallest stand point to view. To me this is likely a dominant behavior ? Non of my hen chicks in the pass ever did anything like this. I mean they would fly to the lap for treats that’s it.
 

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