Antibiotics will soon require vet prescription

Kiki

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Thanks for sharing.

"Tylosin, penicillin and tetracyclines are among some of the more popular antibiotics still available over the counter as injectables – for now. In 2018, the FDA published a five-year plan for phasing out all antibiotics without a veterinarian’s prescription. The plan should be fully implemented by 2023, although compliance is expected as soon as 2020."
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Here is the other link mentioned in the article.
https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/09/25/2019-20688/recommendations-for-sponsors-of-medically-important-antimicrobial-drugs-approved-for-use-in-animals
 

perchie.girl

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Thanks for sharing.

"Tylosin, penicillin and tetracyclines are among some of the more popular antibiotics still available over the counter as injectables – for now. In 2018, the FDA published a five-year plan for phasing out all antibiotics without a veterinarian’s prescription. The plan should be fully implemented by 2023, although compliance is expected as soon as 2020."
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Here is the other link mentioned in the article.
https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/09/25/2019-20688/recommendations-for-sponsors-of-medically-important-antimicrobial-drugs-approved-for-use-in-animals
excellent post Kiki... The only thing I administer on my own is worming meds... Horses Goats and Chickens. I did get some banamine from a vet to have some on hand if and when My horse colicked.

I have some Butazolitan as well. Niether are antibiotics but a kind of must have for horses if you dont have quick access to a vet. Bute Is like Asparine... Banamine is a pain reliever and muscle relaxer... both have a huge shelf life.

deb
 

Cyprus

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I am glad that I do already have Pen G on hand. Although I almost never used or plan to use it, I prefer to have it available in case of emergency.
My personal wish is that more people would treat either holistically or just leave their animal to heal on their own. Chickens are not humans. They do not need coddling and heaps of long-winded, high strength medications. They are more than capable of healing themselves from a skin wound or even a deep wound.

Think of why we have so many strains of Cocci that are unresponsive to Corid. It's because the majority of people jumped on that bandwagon and over used it. Now it's a practically useless and ineffective medication.

-Cy
 
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microchick

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What this is going to hurt are flock owners who do not have access to veterinary care for their birds due to local vets not taking care of 'exotic' animals such as chickens, ducks and turkeys.

Don't get me wrong. I'm a retired medical professional and am very much aware of the importance of regulating unscrupulous use of antibiotics in both the animals we eat and in our own bodies. But. Not everything is black and white. There is an area of gray that cannot be ignored and I and my flock are in that area. No veterinary care for avian breeds closer than almost 100 miles away. My flock depends on me for their care if they are hurt or sick. I do not use antibiotics indiscriminately but I know that the option to treat my birds if the need arises is being taken away from me.

Our local farm vet treats ostriches and emus. Guess it's time to carry out my threat to strap stilts to my chickens legs, pluck their neck and head feathers and call them a new breed of ostrich if they get sick.

In the mean time, time to stock up on fish antibiotics.
 

Shadrach

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I must admit I've been pretty horrified when reading many of the health and injury posts here where people have been advised to give their animals this or that antibiotic by people who haven't even examined the creature let alone diagnosed what ails it.
I'm all for much tighter control an antibiotics in general. it's just a shame better controls can't be implemented for those who will doubtless help keepers to get around the restrictions on forums such as this.
 

BDutch

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Regulation is good .. but not enough. We have this regulations in the Netherlands sinds quit some time now. But resistance its still getting worse.

Many people (especially farmers) are already resistant for some bacteria there are no antibiotics available.

Regulating helps a bit. But there are still too many vets who prescribe antibiotics. And there is illegal use too.

We just have too many cattle and commercial thinking vets here in the Netherlands. And its certainly true that people on some forums promote the use of antibiotics.

Sadly enough the government takes no action in this. Controlling the vets who prescribe too much AB for no good reason to hobby holders is no priority.
 

dawg53

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The problem starts with the chicken owner not following biosecurity protocols. Injuries are one thing, but how many threads are posted regarding respiratory diseases or fungal infections in their flock? Just read the examples in the Emergency section where someone unknowingly or knowingly brings sick birds into their otherwise clean flock.

We read all the time where Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (MG) is like nothing more than a common cold and treated as such, which is terrible misinformation.
Birds should be immediately culled upon diagnosis of MG no matter if it's mild strain or severe strain. Folks dont know what this disease does internally to birds besides making them sick whether they see symptoms or not. Antibiotics only mask respiratory disease symptoms, birds are never cured.

When people get a cold, they reach for the medicine cabinet. They do the same for birds when they get sick...thinking like a human, if the meds helped me, they'll help my birds.
BIRDS are a different ballgame, they arnt human and shouldnt be treated as such. They are never cured and survivors are carriers for life.

The bottomline; antibiotics are worthless when it comes to the majority of bird diseases. Sick birds are never cured from respiratory diseases and other types of diseases. There ARE exceptions, for example; Coccidiosis if caught early.
For cuts, scrapes and other injuries to prevent infection, antibiotics will be needed.

It boils down to biosecurity and common sense. I am pro antibiotic when they're needed. I've never had a respiratory disease in any of my flocks all these years, one case of a fungal issue which was treated successfully with Oxine. Yes, I practice strict biosecurity.
 

Shadrach

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The problem starts with the chicken owner not following biosecurity protocols. Injuries are one thing, but how many threads are posted regarding respiratory diseases or fungal infections in their flock? Just read the examples in the Emergency section where someone unknowingly or knowingly brings sick birds into their otherwise clean flock.

We read all the time where Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (MG) is like nothing more than a common cold and treated as such, which is terrible misinformation.
Birds should be immediately culled upon diagnosis of MG no matter if it's mild strain or severe strain. Folks dont know what this disease does internally to birds besides making them sick whether they see symptoms or not. Antibiotics only mask respiratory disease symptoms, birds are never cured.

When people get a cold, they reach for the medicine cabinet. They do the same for birds when they get sick...thinking like a human, if the meds helped me, they'll help my birds.
BIRDS are a different ballgame, they arnt human and shouldnt be treated as such. They are never cured and survivors are carriers for life.

The bottomline; antibiotics are worthless when it comes to the majority of bird diseases. Sick birds are never cured from respiratory diseases and other types of diseases. There ARE exceptions, for example; Coccidiosis if caught early.
For cuts, scrapes and other injuries to prevent infection, antibiotics will be needed.

It boils down to biosecurity and common sense. I am pro antibiotic when they're needed. I've never had a respiratory disease in any of my flocks all these years, one case of a fungal issue which was treated successfully with Oxine. Yes, I practice strict biosecurity.
I'm very interested in the use of Oxine. How did you administer it?
 
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