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Any ideas how close to lambing

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by GypsyCandy, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. GypsyCandy

    GypsyCandy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 19, 2016
    [​IMG] hey all first time with prego sheep any ideas how close she be
     
  2. WallabyOfChaos

    WallabyOfChaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My guess is that she is probably another 30 days from lambing, but she could go earlier. Her bag isn't particularly full, and she doesn't look all that springy just yet. Most of our adult ewes start building a bag when they are about 30 days from lambing, and then within a few days of lambing they get a bit of a sway in their step and their bag really balloons. Just keep a close eye on her and be sure that she is taking in enough calories for and her growing lamb(s). Pregnancy toxemia is one of the biggest worries with late gestation ewes, and is easily avoidable as long as they have the right nutrition.

    Here is a really great resource with tons of good information for new and experienced sheepers: http://sheep101.info/
     
  3. GypsyCandy

    GypsyCandy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 19, 2016
    I not sure if I feeding right atm she getting hay and grain fed daily
     
  4. WallabyOfChaos

    WallabyOfChaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If your feed is formulated for sheep, and you are following the label directions, and she has good hay or pasture free choice, then she is probably getting what she needs. We keep a loose stock salt and loose sheep mineral out free-choice for our ewes all year. A good mineral is essential. Have you given much thought to your vaccination program?
     
  5. GypsyCandy

    GypsyCandy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 19, 2016
    Not really I know they got drenched just before I got them 2 weeks ago. Just going to get through them giving birth and having to bottle feed the young. Ewes have teat issues. Bag I got did not come with any detections it just what the produce shop suggested
     
  6. WallabyOfChaos

    WallabyOfChaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would get them set up on their CD&T vaccination. Vaccinating the ewe will pass some level of immunity on to the lamb, which will help protect the lambs until they are old enough to get their own series of shots started. Tetanus is a common killer for young lambs. They can go from just fine to symptomatic over night, and once the symptoms are apparent they usually can't be saved. This year, we used Essential 3 + T made by Colorado Serum, and so far we are liking the results. It does have a 21-day slaughter withdrawl though. Just something to keep in mind if you are planning to send the ewes on to the sale shortly after their lambs are born.
     
  7. GypsyCandy

    GypsyCandy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 19, 2016
    So I just had a look at there paperwork they got vaccinated in December
     
  8. WallabyOfChaos

    WallabyOfChaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you know what vaccine they were given?
     
  9. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    If your ewes have teat issues, you still need to make sure the babies get colostrum for 24 hours before pulling from mom. You may be able to get some frozen. I would stay away from the "colostrum replacer" you can buy in some stores. It's really just not good enough to give the babies enough immunity.
     
  10. WallabyOfChaos

    WallabyOfChaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are good colostrum replacers on the market. Personally, I wouldn't source fresh or frozen colostrum from another flock because of the risk of disease. Also, the quality of that colostrum will be subject to the level of nutrition in that animal's diet, and her genetic predisposition to milk quality. A store-bought colostrum will have guaranteed analysis regarding nutrition, so you know what you are getting. We raise sheep for a living and have had very good results from this colostrum replacer:

    https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e07a23-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5

    Our local feed store and vet clinic keep that particular brand on hand, and we have raised countless bummers starting with that replacer and then transitioning to a milk replacer formulated specifically for lambs.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016

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