At a loss.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by rlmullins, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I prefer 30% the first 17 days (and monitoring air cells), but unless you have extremely small air cells, I would not fret too much at 40%.
    I also shoot for at least 70% at hatch though I ultimately shoot for 75% because I am a hands on hatcher. If you are a hands off hatcher you can get by with 65%
    For incubation your temps in still air should be between 101-102 taken near the tops of the eggs. Many people drop a degree at hatch.
     
  2. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    I have lots of small holes in my incubators, I used a screw driver and put about 20 in each, and my temp is holding between 100 and 102 one I have jumps to 104 very now and then, but it come back down, I think another thing I may have done wrong with the others is I laid them on their side, I read a post that they could drowned if you don't keep them up right, but I think between that and my humidity and temp is why I lost the last ones, I think y'all so much for the help, and if y'all think of anything else just keep me posted, I am looking for all the advice I can get.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    The only way that they will drown on their side is if the humidity was too high over the average of the incubation and the eggs did not loose enough moisture. Either monitoring and marking the air cell or weighing the eggs will help you keep track of that. If the air cells are too small and not enough moisture has left the egg, then it is better to hatch upright because it MAY prevent extra moisture seeping into the air cell at pip and causing the chick to drown. You can read more bout the humidity and air cells size here: http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity
    This is the method I use (very successfully). If you have a steady temp in the bator and accurate thermometers, you can get a good hatch out of just about anything (with good quality local eggs).
    Good luck on future hatches.
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    What are you comparing that thermometer to? Unless you've calibrated it, you have no idea if it is accurate. For still air, 101 - 102 measured at top of eggs is required. Less than that can give you chicks that don't develop well. Your results with the first hatch indicated that temp was too low. If you were having a hard time getting your humidity down in the first hatch without adding water, I'm guessing that you didn't have enough ventilation in the bator, even with all of those holes. You might need to make some bigger holes. But, if you had water in the bator throughout the first hatch, that would definitely be a problem for getting the humidity down! Wishing you the best with your second hatch.
     
  5. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    I read and saved that page, I think I might have everything going good now, I hope anyway, I am going to candle today and check out the air cells, and the eggs and make sure everything i going smooth, and make the air cells so i can keep up with them, I have 5 that go on lock down in 4 days, I think I will keep them setting up right just to be on the safe side, thanks for the help.
     
  6. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Just make sure when you hatch upright, keep an eye at the bottom of the eggs for any malepositioned pips because they are harder to see and it's easier for them to run into problems upright. Unless you have a hands off approach, then it doesn't matter. Good luck. Hope to hear good things!
     
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  7. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    I had water in the incubator with the first hatch, my humidity staid to high at 55%, I did my first one all wrong, I use an accuright digital thermometer, It is very accurate on temp and humidity, I have everything set up good now I think, this is my first time hatching so I am new at it all, I am working on my second batch of eggs now, and so far I have been going by every ones advice I will just have to see how it all goes.
     
  8. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    You poor hatcher trying to go by everyone's advice. [​IMG]
     
  9. red horse ranch

    red horse ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been rereading your posts rimullins. You said you had been using your own eggs to hatch and I wanted to share my first hatch last weekend. I started out with 28 eggs. Only 15 made it to lockdown. All 15 had live chicks at lockdown. But only 9 of them hatched. The others failed to pip. I think when eggs are collected in January the breeders aren't in top physical condition. Mine had been confined a lot during December and January. The health and age of the breeders has a lot to do with the ability of the chicks to hatch. It's very possible that you didn't do anything wrong.
    I have another bunch of eggs incubating now. Out of 33 eggs that I started with only 21 appear to be developing. Hopefully a better percentage of these will actually hatch.

    I don't think laying the eggs on their side caused your chicks to drown. I always lay mine on the side. But what is important is to candle them before laying them on their side. The air cell will dip down one side of the egg and this should on the up side of the egg when it is laid in the incubator. This way when the chick internally pips the beak will be in the air cell.
    Good luck.[​IMG]
     
  10. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I did an Easter hatch last year with eggs I bought from a local gal. I really wanted eggs out of her silkie pen because she had a SG in there but the silkies weren't laying well and I ended up with only 3 from her silkie pen. Out of 36 that went into lockdown, only 3 did not make it. One of those three hatched, but only with in like 4 hours of pipping and still had a fully functioning vascular system between egg and chick and a ruptured yolk sac. The other two made it all the way to day 19/20 and shrink wrapped tight (I have pics). All her other birds were laying well and hatched perfectly, including Spitzhaubens and black Jap bantams (the rest were mixes). I would put money on the fact that they were laying low quality eggs because of time of year and they weren't regular in their cycle. I vowed I would never buy eggs again unless the birds were laying regularly. So I do think time of year makes a difference- to a certain extent. Plus you have the fact that fertility is often lower during cold winter.

    I mark my cells days 7/14/18 to monitor the growth and to have an idea of where the chick should pip.

    I do however believe that the majority of eggs that make it to lockdown that don't survive, are usually due to either temps being too low or humidity being too high.
     

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