Australian Shepherd issues

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by rodriguezpoultry, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    So...I faced my fear and went to adoption day. There was a gorgeous Australian Shepherd tri-color there. I did the "may I pet her?" hold out hand for sniff...stuff.

    Again I was snarled at. Bristles up...hackle raised and lunging at me. My husband did it and NO problem!!! Why does this breed hate me? The foster said she had never done anything like that before!! The 10 year old behind me ran up and hugged the dog no problem?!


    Im SO over this breed. If I ever see one near my property it's dead. I am not going to be attacked a 6th time. Done.
     
  2. cravenchx

    cravenchx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Piedmont of NC
    I used to have one. She didn't like me and I didn't like her!
     
  3. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    She may have sensed that you have an issue with the breed in general. You have been bit by that breed 5 times? I don't think I'd like them much either.
     
  4. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Claremore, OK
    Bit 4...attacked once. A blue Merle male. He would charge, snarling with teeth bared. I was 10. He did it daily. The owner an my parents never believed me until I came back from sledding and tackled me to the ground and tore up my coat. As in...the hood was not attached anymore. My mom had to beat him away with a shovel as I covered my head with my hands. The owner "took him to a farm" the next day.
     
  5. FlyRobinFly

    FlyRobinFly Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 31, 2011
    I think carolinagirl is right, they can tell you don't feel good about them, based on your bad experience with the first dog. Animals are pretty tuned in to the tiny signals we give off.
     
  6. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It may be that the dog is picking up on signals you aren't aware of (fear on your part, ie. increased perspiration, body signals, chemical signals, etc). May be that you are around some type of animal/something that your husband is not? Ie. One girl couldn't figure out why the lab rabbits kept mauling her and no one else. She had a pet ferret at home. May be that there is something natural to you that looks 'off' to the dog. Ie. A dog may not discriminate between a limp and someone stumbling around drunk as being someone who seems 'off'/not behaving normally in their eyes. Herding breeds and some others seem especially aware of such things.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
  7. Mountain Man Jim

    Mountain Man Jim Chillin' With My Peeps

    You can come over and pet our Aussie. He's a great boy.

    Though, he is very submissive. When you have a chance, look up "fear + grimace + dog" and try to learn how this facial expression compares to a snarl. Our dog Jasper grimaces all the time as a greeting. Our theory is that, since his tail was docked (not by us), he can't use his tail very well to communicate. Hence, he uses the grimace to show submission. Since he grimaces alot, visitors (human ones) confuse his facial expression as threatening, which couldn't be further from the truth. When other dogs grimace, it often means that they have extreme fear of the situation. If you ignored the dog's fearful posturing and continued to enter his safe zone, he may have lashed out at you out of fear, not malice. Fearful dogs can be very unpredictable.

    You don't need to worry about Jasper though, he loves people.

    Jim
     
  8. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd bet that the dog knew that you were afraid. Dogs don't like people who act unusual or suspicious.

    Were you nervous that the dog might not like you? Were you thinking "here we go again, hope it goes better than the last time"
    Dogs pick up on that hesitation, that quickened pulse, the shallow/faster breathing. The dog thinks "OMG, what's up with this chick??? I'd be watch out for her!" Then you react to the dog's behavior and have created exactly what you feared, another Aussie that doesn't like you.

    The best bet for you to "meet" an Aussie and get to know one is to ignore them. Let the dog approach you. That gives you a chance to calm down and the dog a chance to see that you aren't a threat. Of course, that would require having a friend who owns one or visiting the foster family for the rescue. Just sit down on the couch and enjoy the company of the people.
     
  9. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:X2.

    Aussies are very perceptive and intelligent dogs, while at the same time being very independent free thinkers. If they percieve a threat, they act on it.
     
  10. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:X2.

    Aussies are very perceptive and intelligent dogs, while at the same time being very independent free thinkers. If they percieve a threat, they act on it.

    X3
     

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