Avian Influenza - Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association Updates

RebelEgger

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May 10, 2020
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I'm starting this thread to help update and educate anyone in Nova Scotia Canada who is looking for information regarding the current avian influenza situation in our province. I will continue updates as I receive them.
I am going to share the information I have dating back from February to current.
There is a lot of great information on BYC covering AI, including the article Bird Flu: What You Need To Know but I thought Nova Scotians might want to know what the NSVMA and CFIA are saying about the situation.
Some of the information may be repetitive, but I am just copying and pasting as it comes.


Avian Influenza Update Feb. 1, 2022
Avian Influenza (H5N1 HPAI as seen in Newfoundland) has been confirmed in a Canada
Goose found in the Grand Desert area of Nova Scotia. In addition, a small poultry flock in
the area and a commercial poultry operation in the Gaspereau Valley have reported
clinical signs consistent with HPAI. In response CFIA has issued a declaration of infected
place for both premises including quarantine and movement restrictions. These findings,
combined with the recent cases in Newfoundland and Labrador and the Carolinas
indicate the presence of AI in migratory birds on the East Atlantic Flyway and indicate AI
poses an ongoing risk to domestic poultry. Wild birds, especially waterfowl, often show no
symptoms yet spread the disease. Good biosecurity, especially avoiding contact with
wild birds and their excrement, is critical to preventing the disease.
Clinical signs of AI:
- Decreased production
- Diarrhea
- Depression
- Swelling of skin under eyes
- Swollen/congested wattles and combs
- High and sudden mortality
Suspicion is based on clinical signs, but laboratory testing is needed to confirm presence
of the virus.
In domestic poultry, AI is a reportable disease under the Health of Animals Act and
any suspected disease must be reported to CFIA. A NS hotline has been set up at
902-365-8653.
If you have questions about Avian Influenza in wild birds, please contact the
Department of Natural Resources and Renewables at 1-800-565-2224.
Transmission to humans in close contact with poultry or contact with heavily
contaminated environments is possible. Personal protective equipment (PPE) including
masks, goggles and gloves are recommended when handling suspected cases.
Vaccination for the human influenza is also recommended.
For more information:
Fact Sheet - Avian Influenza

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Clients of the Nova Scotia Animal Health Laboratory
Enhanced biosecurity and biosafety procedures have been implemented in the Nova Scotia Animal
Health Laboratory as a response to the detection of highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in the
province.
If you are experiencing sudden increased mortality in your flock or have a suspicion that you have
clinical signs suggesting Avian Influenza, please contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for advice.
Clinical signs of HPAI can include high mortality, decreased production, diarrhea, depression,
swollen/congested wattles and combs, respiratory signs and swelling of skin under eyes.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency NS Hotline 902-365-8653.
Avoid handling live or dead birds. Local offices of the Department of Natural Resources and Renewables
should be contacted if the public sees sick or dead birds
If you would like to report a sick or dead wild bird, Contact the Nova Scotia Department of Natural
Resources and Renewables 1-800-565-2224

If you wish to submit a bird for post mortem examination these are being received by the laboratory and
all avian cases will be screened for the presence of Avian Influenza.
The laboratory is open 8:30-4:30 M-F for specimen reception and located at
65 River Road,
Bible Hill, NS
After hours carcass reception is available 8:30-4:30 weekends and holidays by telephoning 902-956-
0028 to make arrangements for delivery to the laboratory.
If you wish to deliver carcasses to the laboratory directly, please do not bring these into the reception
area of the laboratory. Enter the main entrance and deliver or fill in a submission form, carcass
reception will be restricted to the loading dock area.
Please complete an Avian Submission form including all available information in the highlighted sections
for all specimens being submitted. This form can be delivered with the carcasses or can be emailed or
faxed to the laboratory (contact information below).
If you wish to submit carcasses for examination but do not want to enter the building, please contact
the laboratory by telephone for advice. Contactless submissions can be accommodated.
Submission Form

Telephone: 902-893-6540
Fax: 902-895-6684
Email: [email protected]

Avian Influenza and Small Flocks webinar presented by Perennia
Recording of the NS Avian Influenza Update held on Wednesday, March 30th

IMG_1637.jpg

IMG_1638.jpg



Notice to Canada’s veterinarians on the ongoing outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1)

This has been an unprecedented year for avian influenza (AI) in Canada. The virus has been detected in wild birds in every Canadian province, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is responding to detections of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) in commercial poultry flocks and small flocks across the country. The latest information on the ongoing response to AI in Canada is available on the CFIA website.

The CFIA, Environment and Climate Change Canada, provincial governments and industry partners are actively communicating with producers, small flock owners and the general public to raise awareness of the situation. This is being done through web statements, meetings, email notifications, social media and other channels.

Veterinarians in local private practices across the country may have clients seeking advice or medical attention for their pet birds and small flocks, or to report sick or dead wild birds.

Signs of avian influenza:
Infected birds may show one or many of these signs:

lack of energy, movement or appetite
decreased egg production
swelling around the head, neck and eyes
coughing, gasping for air or sneezing
nervous signs, tremors or lack of coordination
diarrhea
sudden death

Wild birds such as ducks and geese can carry avian influenza without looking sick.

Reporting cases of avian influenza

If you suspect a pet bird or small flock has avian influenza, contact your nearest CFIA Animal Health office as soon as possible.

Anyone who finds a sick or dead wild bird is encouraged to contact the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) using their online reporting tool or at 1-800-567-2033.

Keeping pet birds and small flocks safe from AI

The CFIA recommends all pet bird and small flock owners follow these 5 tips to protect their birds from AI:

Prevent contact with wild birds and other animals.
Frequently clean coops, waterers, feeders, your clothing and footwear.
Spot the signs of avian influenza and report early to a veterinarian or the CFIA.
Limit exposure to visitors.
Separate birds – keep birds, their water and food away from wild birds.

A printable PDF is available on the CFIA website. You can also find more information on how to protect your flock from avian influenza online.

The CFIA also strongly recommends that Canadian owners of small flocks and pet birds immediately stop the distribution of live birds, eggs and other bird products (meat, feathers) outside of their households. This helps reduce the risk of disease spread and limit the degree of control measures the CFIA would need to impose should AI be detected on the premises. If birds or their products are distributed outside the household, the small flock is considered poultry as per the OIE’s definition. If AI is detected on a premises, the CFIA is required to implement more control measures for poultry than for non-poultry flocks, which also impacts all poultry producers within a minimum 10 km radius of the infected premises.

Public health considerations

Human infections with the H5N1 virus are rare and symptoms in human cases are often limited to conjunctivitis or mild respiratory disease; however some viruses can cause severe illness. There is no evidence to suggest that the consumption of cooked poultry or eggs could transmit avian influenza to humans. All the evidence to date indicates that thorough cooking will kill the virus.

People should avoid all contact with wild birds, including access to ponds or bodies of water known to be used by wild birds. Anyone who comes in direct contact with bird droppings should thoroughly wash their hands with soap and warm water.

Anyone who comes into close contact with sick or dead birds suspected to have AI should contact their local public health unit immediately.
Helpful resources

Keep your birds safe
Protect your flock from bird flu
Response to detections of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) in Canada 2021 to 2022
Map: Avian influenza zones
Highly pathogenic avian influenza - wild birds dashboard
Avian influenza (H5N1) - Canada.ca

Thank you for your efforts to support Canada’s response to avian influenza.

May 2022 - Update on Avian Influenza
This has been an unprecedented year for avian influenza (AI) in Canada. The virus has been detected in wild birds in every Canadian province, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is responding to detections of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) in commercial poultry flocks and small flocks across the country.
The CFIA, Environment and Climate Change Canada, provincial governments and industry partners are actively communicating with producers, small flock owners and the general public to raise awareness of the situation.
Veterinarians in local private practices across the country may have clients seeking advice or medical attention for their pet birds and small flocks, or to report sick or dead wild birds. Advise clients that they should not touch sick or dead birds. You should not take sick or dead wild birds into your clinic. Anyone who finds a sick or dead wild bird is encouraged to contact the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) using their online reporting tool or at 1- 800-567-2033.
If you suspect a pet bird or small flock has avian influenza, contact your nearest CFIA Animal Health office as soon as possible.
The CFIA recommends all pet bird and small flock owners follow these 5 tips to protect birds from AI:
1. Prevent contact with wild birds and other animals.
2. Frequently clean coops, waterers, feeders, your clothing and footwear.
3. Spot the signs of avian influenza and report early to a veterinarian or the CFIA.
4. Limit exposure to visitors.
5. Separate birds – keep birds, their water and food away from wild birds.
The CFIA also strongly recommends that Canadian owners of small flocks and pet birds immediately stop the distribution of live birds, eggs and other bird products (meat, feathers) outside of their households.
People should avoid all contact with wild birds, including access to ponds or bodies of water known to be used by wild birds.
Anyone who comes into close contact with sick or dead birds suspected to have AI should contact their local public health unit immediately.
 

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Thanks for posting.. I currently have some coughing, sneezing chickens.. I'm not sure what to do, if they just have that one symptom, would I need to call someone?
 
Thanks for posting.. I currently have some coughing, sneezing chickens.. I'm not sure what to do, if they just have that one symptom, would I need to call someone?

CFIA website says:

If you suspect your birds have HPAI

Contact a veterinarian to determine if further action is needed, or your nearest CFIA Animal Health office.

Nova Scotia – Animal health

Hours of operation: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
902-536-1010

Have said that, a lot of veterinarians are not poultry vets, so it may be best to contact CFIA directly if you are concerned.
Coughing and sneezing can also be explained with other things though, so consider your flocks risk factor too.
Good luck!!
 

CFIA website says:

If you suspect your birds have HPAI

Contact a veterinarian to determine if further action is needed, or your nearest CFIA Animal Health office.

Nova Scotia – Animal health

Hours of operation: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
902-536-1010

Have said that, a lot of veterinarians are not poultry vets, so it may be best to contact CFIA directly if you are concerned.
Coughing and sneezing can also be explained with other things though, so consider your flocks risk factor too.
Good luck!!
I ended up speaking to a poultry vet, he said to give it a couple weeks, as it sounded like an resperatory virus. He said if they got worse, and other symptoms appeared then to to see him.. but other than that, not to worry too much.
 
I ended up speaking to a poultry vet, he said to give it a couple weeks, as it sounded like an resperatory virus. He said if they got worse, and other symptoms appeared then to to see him.. but other than that, not to worry too much.
Yes, those sensitive little respiratory systems. Good luck with your flock! I hope whatever it is, it passes soon.
 

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