B.Y.C. Dorking Club!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by chickenmum, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Roanoke VA
    sorry to hear of the problems with hatching and shipped chicks...

    [​IMG] for me, i've got 2 due today (sg) and 7 red, 2 sg, and 2 red/colored due to hatch on the 7th, and 1 more sg on the 8th.

    hoping i didn't lose any, my incubator ran cool for a bit yesterday, i checked it, it was 95 deg. for maybe 5-6 hours. but it's back running good again. not sure what happenned either.

    and i should get 2 doz or so colored eggs either tomorrow or wed.
    [​IMG]

    my new 'bator is warming up for em. i really need to get my new shelf built so i can put all 3 incubators on it LOL.
     
  2. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    That amount of cooling should have practically no impact at all. Incubating eggs are much more capable of dealing with cooling than overheating. That's nothing. You can lose power for a day--keep your incubator SHUT--and still pull off a respectable hatch. Overheating, though, cooks them quickly.

    PS: Cooled eggs often take a little longer to hatch, say the 22nd or 23rd day.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  3. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    One most certainly can!!! [​IMG] Yet it comes down to certain number basics, especially considering the current state of Dorkings. For each hatching season, you're going to get:
    1. a high percentage of junk
    2. some with good color but poor type
    3. some with good type, but poor color,
    4. a very few with good type and color--these are those one hopes to keep.

    The expected percentage for number 4 is 10%. Last year we raised 150 white Dorkings and kept 13 as breeders--with rare breeds the 10% can be a bit tough. So, when wanting multiple color varieties, one of a few things will happen:

    1. You have capacious facilities and time to raise out enough chicks in each variety to be able to cull effectively, which allows you to do multiple colors properly--full steam ahead.
    2. You don't have the facilities and time, in which case you end up with sloppy seconds because you're forced to keep as breeders stock you otherwise wouldn't, were you to have a larger pool from which to select. In this case progress is made very slowly, if at all.
    3. A random miracle happens.

    The scenario for number two happens uber-frequently. One of two things tend to happen:
    1. Only as many chicks are hatched as the smaller facilities can maintain, which would be adequate for one variety but cannot house enough in multiple varieties. At the end of the season the breeder has a pen of healthy birds, but the percentage of birds worthy of the breeding pen per variety is miniscule, if there are any at all.
    2. One tries to raise out more chicks than one's facility can house properly in which case cannibalism, disease, poor growth rates, and stress lead to a mammoth mess of unhealthy birds, none of which are worthy of the breeding pens and an entire season is wasted.

    Ultimately the result of these scenarios tends to be that one becomes disgusted and quits or opts for limitation which leads to eventual success and a deeper enjoyment of the hobby. In the second scenario, the breeder is proud of his or her accomplishments and the breed is advanced by the development of an outstanding strain. Substance is often more satisfying than illusion.

    PS: Random miracles are always cool, though. We saw one at the fair last year. One can always: [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  4. capayvalleychick

    capayvalleychick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    AWESOME.

    That is my goal.
    Kim
     
  5. capayvalleychick

    capayvalleychick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is that true? The power company is going to shut down power for the day where the guy lives, who is incubating my eggs. He has plans to rig up a car battery for power.

    Kim
     
  6. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Barrington, NH
    By all means, if he can do that, go for it! However, yes, if the power goes out, the eggs can stand cool to an extent. It has happened to us on a couple of occasions. One evening I even took eggs out to go into the hatcher and got distracted. Not the following morning, but the one after, I saw them on the work bench and panicked. I ran outside and threw them under a broody game hen, and half of them hatched!

    If you have to face a day without power:
    1. Don't open the doors!!!!
    2. Depending on the type of incubator, wrap it in good blankets---be aware of all fire danger with the blankets should the power come back on!!!!! and do not plug the ventilation!
    3. Lot's of prayers to Saint Anthony [​IMG]
     
  7. Purdy

    Purdy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sign me up
    Don't have any, want a pair of hens
    will to make a road trip.
    We first saw these wonder hens at Plymouth Rock Heritage Farm MA
    What not love about a chicken who took a ride on the Mayflower 1n 1692!
     
  8. jgervais

    jgervais Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How old was the rooster? Weight?
     
  9. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Roanoke VA
    well i'm fortunate in several respects. I have the room to do as large or small scale as I want, plenty of room for more/larger coops/pens as needed, and a patient hubby. oh and a need for 200+ carcases for the freezer. LOL

    what i've found works best for me, is to keep the breeders penned, and everyone else is free ranging daily. it's an amazing sight to watch a flock of dorklings running across the yard in pursuit of someone who has a tastier tidbit than they did. LOL

    granted, i HATE plucking, so most birds i process are peeled... but the dogs don't seem to care what their dinner looks like, and hubby hates to pick bones. so skin is a bit non-essential. maybe some day i'll get an auto plucker, but until then, i'll keep peeling them. - side note, i've got several people lined up who want feathers for fly tying and crafts. so consider that for future processing days...

    of course, right now all i have are silver greys, but i've got one pullet getting ready to lay, and 7 more that should within the next 2 months. so then i'll be able to start hatching seriously. it's kind of hard to plan a hatch with 1 here and 2 there. LOL and even if i hold off a week that's still less than a dozen eggs set at a time...

    on the plus side, I have 2 doz colored eggs coming in this week, and i'm picking up about 4 doz red eggs on saturday, as well as 3 colored hens. now i just need eggs to hatch and chicks to mature for those girls. until then they'll get one of the cockerels when he's ready, so i can start learning the color genetics.

    oh! and i finally finished the horse trailer coop! so that's way more room than i need right now for the 20+ birds living in it. LOL not that they wanted to come out today either. nobody was brave enough to venture into the frozen white wilderness called snow (all 1 inch of it), until i shoveled a path for them to the driveway LOL. wimps. all of em.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  10. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Jun 22, 2009
    Barrington, NH
    Awesome, Ki4got! It's that large capacity that can lead to success in multiple varieties. It sounds like you're "cokking on the front burner" as my grandmother used to say. Full steam ahead!
     

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