Barring genetics

humblehillsfarm

Crowing
Mar 27, 2020
1,837
3,061
281
Southwestern Pennsylvania
I have gone down the rabbit hole of attempting to understand the barring gene. From my understanding the barring gene occurs on the male chromosome (Z). So a male can carry it on both chromosome (Zz) or carry it on one. The hitch is, there are two versions (alleles) of the barring gene (B1 and B2) which produce barring. In modern day sexed linked chickens (barred Plymouth rocks for example), B1 is the predominant allele, or version. When both genes (for male ZZ; for female ZW) are affected a defined barring will be present. If the female receives the unaffected gene (zW) she would not be a carrier of the barring gene. However if the male only has one affected gene (Zz) then his plumage will be essentially white with very little pigmentation. This is my rooster except he has a few wisps of black in his long tail feathers. This means he passed on his affected gene to the female, and in the (ZW) condition she would show a defined barring. If the male had both affected genes (ZZ) and mated with another hen with barring (ZW) 100% of his offspring would be barred. If the female was a non carrier (zW) then the males would be white with very little pigmentation (Zz) and the females would all be barred.

So not only do I think the white rooster and the buff Brahma are the parents, but I also think my chick is a girl. 🤔

I deduced my info from Wiki if anyone feels giving me a different interpretation. I know very little about genetics so I’m not sure if I’m on to something or not. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex-linked_barring
 
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MysteryChicken

Free Ranging
May 31, 2018
10,157
18,953
631
East, Tawas Michigan
I have gone down the rabbit hole of attempting to understand the barring gene. From my understanding the barring gene occurs on the male chromosome (Z). So a male can carry it on both chromosome (Zz) is carry it on one. The hitch is, there are two versions (alleles) of the barring gene (B1 and B2) which produce barring. In modern day sexed linked chickens(barred Plymouth rocks for example), B1 is the predominant allele, or version. When both genes (for male ZZ; for female ZW) are affected a defined barring will be present. If the female receives the unaffected gene (zW) she would not be a carrier of the barring gene. However if the male only has one affected gene (Zz) then his plumage will be essentially white with very little pigmentation. This is my rooster except he has a few wisps of black in his long tail feathers. This means he passed on his affected gene to the female, and in the (ZW) condition she would show a defined barring.

So not only do I think the white rooster and the buff Brahma are the parents, but I also think my chick is a girl. 🤔

I deduced my info from Wiki if anyone feels giving me a different interpretation. I know very little about genetics so I’m not sure if I’m on to something or not. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex-linked_barring
The chick you posted is a cockerel.
If the Buff Brahma was 100% the mother, the color of the chick should resemble something like this.
20200929_213919.jpg
Since the chick you have is a male, that means the Barred Rock is the mother of the chick.

This is a project Orpington of mine I'm using for example.
 

humblehillsfarm

Crowing
Mar 27, 2020
1,837
3,061
281
Southwestern Pennsylvania
The chick you posted is a cockerel.
If the Buff Brahma was 100% the mother, the color of the chick should resemble something like this.
View attachment 2353861 Since the chick you have is a male, that means the Barred Rock is the mother of the chick.

This is a project Orpington of mine I'm using for example.
I feel conflicted 🤯
 

RoostersAreAwesome

Crossing the Road
May 21, 2017
6,804
20,253
802
I have gone down the rabbit hole of attempting to understand the barring gene. From my understanding the barring gene occurs on the male chromosome (Z). So a male can carry it on both chromosome (Zz) or carry it on one. The hitch is, there are two versions (alleles) of the barring gene (B1 and B2) which produce barring. In modern day sexed linked chickens (barred Plymouth rocks for example), B1 is the predominant allele, or version. When both genes (for male ZZ; for female ZW) are affected a defined barring will be present. If the female receives the unaffected gene (zW) she would not be a carrier of the barring gene. However if the male only has one affected gene (Zz) then his plumage will be essentially white with very little pigmentation. This is my rooster except he has a few wisps of black in his long tail feathers. This means he passed on his affected gene to the female, and in the (ZW) condition she would show a defined barring. If the male had both affected genes (ZZ) and mated with another hen with barring (ZW) 100% of his offspring would be barred. If the female was a non carrier (zW) then the males would be white with very little pigmentation (Zz) and the females would all be barred.

So not only do I think the white rooster and the buff Brahma are the parents, but I also think my chick is a girl. 🤔

I deduced my info from Wiki if anyone feels giving me a different interpretation. I know very little about genetics so I’m not sure if I’m on to something or not. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex-linked_barring
A rooster with a single copy of sex-linked barring will be darker, not lighter. However, double barred males can be almost entirely white, but that’s only with chickens specifically bred for that coloration, and is still pretty uncommon. One example of this would be 55 flowery leghorns, but those also use mottling (white spots) to appear so light.
Your white rooster could have dominant or recessive white, both of which can cover barring.
Could you get a clear closeup picture of the chick’s comb?
 

humblehillsfarm

Crowing
Mar 27, 2020
1,837
3,061
281
Southwestern Pennsylvania
A rooster with a single copy of sex-linked barring will be darker, not lighter. However, double barred males can be almost entirely white, but that’s only with chickens specifically bred for that coloration, and is still pretty uncommon. One example of this would be 55 flowery leghorns, but those also use mottling (white spots) to appear so light.
Your white rooster could have dominant or recessive white, both of which can cover barring.
Could you get a clear closeup picture of the chick’s comb?
Here are the latest pictures of the barred chick.
 

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nicalandia

Crowing
Jul 16, 2009
8,294
3,148
456
Stuck In a Dream
My Coop
I have gone down the rabbit hole of attempting to understand the barring gene. From my understanding the barring gene occurs on the male chromosome (Z). So a male can carry it on both chromosome (Zz) or carry it on one. The hitch is, there are two versions (alleles) of the barring gene (B1 and B2) which produce barring. In modern day sexed linked chickens (barred Plymouth rocks for example), B1 is the predominant allele, or version. When both genes (for male ZZ; for female ZW) are affected a defined barring will be present. If the female receives the unaffected gene (zW) she would not be a carrier of the barring gene. However if the male only has one affected gene (Zz) then his plumage will be essentially white with very little pigmentation. This is my rooster except he has a few wisps of black in his long tail feathers. This means he passed on his affected gene to the female, and in the (ZW) condition she would show a defined barring. If the male had both affected genes (ZZ) and mated with another hen with barring (ZW) 100% of his offspring would be barred. If the female was a non carrier (zW) then the males would be white with very little pigmentation (Zz) and the females would all be barred.

So not only do I think the white rooster and the buff Brahma are the parents, but I also think my chick is a girl. 🤔

I deduced my info from Wiki if anyone feels giving me a different interpretation. I know very little about genetics so I’m not sure if I’m on to something or not. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex-linked_barring
Actually there are three known barring allele(but there could be more)

B0= Sex linked Extreme Dilution(B^Sed) found on production type white leghorns
B1= Sex linked Barring(B) found on barred rocks
B2 = Sex linked Dilution(B^Sd) also found on white leghorns
 

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