Baytril (enrofloxacin) Sources

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by casportpony, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Baytril (Enrofloxacin)

    Banned for use in poultry, so read this before using:
    FDA bans enrofloxacin use in poultry

    Consult a veterinarian for dosing instructions



    Generic 10% (100mg/ml) prices start at $24.47:

    https://www.ladygouldianfinch.com/shop-meds.php
    shopping_baytril.jpg

    I don't believe that the bottles above have any manufacturing info on them and they certainly are not meant to be used for injections.

    Oral Baytril 10% (100mg/ml) - $24.95
    http://www.allbirdproducts.com/newproductpages/baytril.html
    [​IMG]


    Baytril 2.27% (22.7mg/ml) - $84.95
    Can be purchased here, but it's *very* expensive, so I suggest looking elsewhere:
    https://www.twincitypoultrysupplies...id=957&zenid=d22f72eb1c9cbb9bcd2f9823017ab9a4
    [​IMG]




    Generic 10% injectable (100mg/ml) - Prices usually start at around $25 for small bottles - Google Enfloxil
    [​IMG]


    The following links appear to be broken, so please ignore them


    For those that like pills:
    [​IMG]

    http://www.californiapetpharmacy.com/fiene2560.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    More info:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Crowing

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    Well...now people better get it soon before Uncle Scam's lackeys ban that too.
     
  4. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Just a disclaimer about antibiotic use, especially if you are not consulting with a vet. There are good reasons for the regulation of antibiotics (Though I definitely don't agree with the prices!). One major reason is that giving antibiotics without knowing exactly what is going on with the animal can contribute to antibiotic resistance of the organisms associated with that animal. The use of antibiotics in farm animals is a major problem in human medicine because many pathogens that affect people are becoming resistant. For a long time, antibiotic use in slaughtered animals went unchecked. Now there are strict regulations and withdrawal times for food animals, and veterinarians work hard to regulate the use of antibiotics so that they are used only in animals that absolutely need them.

    As far as I know, baytril is not labeled for use in poultry, so I would not use this in birds that will be food or that lay eggs for human consumption. People who have given baytril to chickens in the past generally keep their eggs from consumption (Some people do this for the life of the bird). Another related issue is that if these antibiotics are used and you have no plans to eat the bird, there is no guarantee that if the bird is sold that the next person will do the same, even if they are told the bird has been treated with antibiotics.

    Another issue is that antibiotics can be specific for certain pathogens (I see some listed above) so if a person gives one type of antibiotic without knowing the cause of disease, it may not do anything at all.

    If you are advised to give this under direction of a vet, then by all means buy it from a cheaper source such as the ones listed!
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    It's cheaper to buy medications rather than paying a vet that doesnt know the difference between a beak and toenail.
     
    Lil Drake40, Miss Lydia and Suzie like this.
  6. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Unfortunately that is often true, but there are many vets out there that are familiar with birds. Additionally, your local cooperative extension or state animal diagnostic center can help guide poultry owners when faced with bird illness. They also have many services and tests that can be run for owners, many of which are free depending on the state.

    Antibiotic use doesn't seem like a big deal at first, but the statistics on resistance are truly scary. There are lots of resources that can help poultry owners make good health decisions for their birds that also takes into account interconnected human health.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2015
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    I am all for giving medications that a competent vet has prescribed, but the reality is most of us cannot afford it... Every time I go to the avian vet it's 90 minutes to get there and at least and hour there, then 90 minutes back. So boom, 4 hours out of the day are gone!, maybe longer if I have to go in commute traffic. Then there is the money, which has never been less than $125, plus the cost of fuel.

    Another thing people don't realize, which dawg does, is that not all vets are created equal and it could take time to find one competent enough to treat poultry, which I found out the hard way ($700 and two dead birds).

    Lots more to say on this subject, but I gotta go get hay now, so it will have to wait. [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    Most of these "diagnostic centers" will suggest submitting a bird for necropsy, but even then, they probably won't give any medical advice, though they might be able to recommend a vet that could.

    Sure, UC Davis can run all sorts of tests for next to nothing, but one has to know how to collect and ship samples properly.

    -Kathy
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I dont waste my time with extension offices. If I dont know what it is, I cull.
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    @Chickerdoodle13 , how would you treat a 100 gram chick with a probable E.coli infection?

    -Kathy
     

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