BCMarans x Golden Cuckoo cross

txchickie

Songster
11 Years
Nov 15, 2008
1,405
14
161
Texas
What would this cross be like? Does anyone have any pictures?

I have 5 BCM hens and 1 golden cuckoo hen in with my BCM rooster. My mom and grandma want some chocolate egg layers of their own so I've been collecting eggs that we will be putting into the incubator this weekend. Problem is I can't always tell my cuckoo's eggs from the BC eggs! I've caught her in the nestbox a couple of times and have been able to sort her eggs off from the others, but I'm not able to catch her laying every day. I am sure we will have at least a couple of the GC/BCM cross hatch and we were all curious what this cross would look like!
 

shakenbake

In the Brooder
10 Years
Aug 27, 2009
44
0
22
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pinkchick

"Ain't nuttin' like having da' blues"
12 Years
May 30, 2008
9,573
75
361
Washington State
Hi!

Golden Cuckoo hen crossed with a BC roo should give you...Gold Cuckoo cockerals and BC pullets . A barred or cuckoo mother can only pass the barring gene down to her sons.

Hope this helps!

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Germaine_11.20

Songster
10 Years
Jun 6, 2009
4,497
24
221
Idaho
Quote:
I am no good with genetics. So how does a pullet or hen become barred if only the sons get it? I am curious because I have Cuckoo Silkies and I was told to breed to a black silkie to have cuckoo offspring.
 

josh44

Songster
11 Years
Jun 16, 2008
1,710
47
181
San Antonio Texas
You Get A Genetic Mess,
The Roosters Will Be Golden Cuckoo, And Pullets Will Look Black Copper, But Will Through Out All Cuckoo & Golden Cuckoo Chicks. That What I Have Herd Anyways
 

pinkchick

"Ain't nuttin' like having da' blues"
12 Years
May 30, 2008
9,573
75
361
Washington State
Barred or Cuckoo hens only have one copy of the barring gene and usually Barred or Cuckoo roos have two copies of the gene unless they came from a cross like we are discussing, then the boys come out with one copy of the barred gene and the girls none. These males from a Cuckoo mom and BC dad will be heterozygous for the barring gene (1 copy of gene) meaning they will not look like a Barred or Cuckoo roo that has 2 copies of the gene which are referred to as homozygous. Normally, a barred or cuckoo male that is homo. is lighter in color than the female, I think that the males are white with black barring unlike the heterozygous female who is black with white barring.
If I made a mistake I hope someone will come along and correct me.
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Why barred or cuckoo mothers cannot pass the barring gene on to their female offspring, I cannot tell you, I don't know but that is how it works.

edited because I can't type
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Last edited:

pinkchick

"Ain't nuttin' like having da' blues"
12 Years
May 30, 2008
9,573
75
361
Washington State
Should have also said that a heterozygous males will be colored like the mothers, black with white barring.

To get barred females from the cross that the OP is suggesting a homozygous barred or cuckoo roo would be used over the BC hen and he would pass done one copy of the barring gene to all of his offspring.
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blackdotte

Songster
11 Years
Nov 18, 2008
786
23
131
Barring (cuckoo) is a dominant sex linked gene, cockerels can have two B/B, hens can only have one B/-
A homozygous males B/B mated to a non barred hen b+/- will produce B/b+ barred males & B/- barred hens.
A heterozygous male B/b+ mated to a non barred hen b+/- will produce B/b+ barred males, B/- barred hens, b+/b+ unbarred males & b+/- unbarred hens.

An unbarred male b+/b+ male to a barred hen B/- can only produce B/b+ barred males & b+/- unbarred hens.

David
 

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