Bee Keeping

EverythingDucks

🙄🤚 𝙻𝚒𝚝𝚝𝚕𝚎 𝙳𝚞𝚌𝚔
Premium Feather Member
May 7, 2020
7,589
65,474
1,086
Bermuda Triangle
Does anyone here have bee's?
I know nothing about them but I'd like to get some in the future. Where should I start? What is the average upfront costs and yearly costs? Are they expensive? Do they take a lot of work? Where should they be kept?
I'll be sure to do lots of research before getting any, I just wanted to start here.
 
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Lovesumchicks

Songster
Apr 22, 2020
214
373
121
We keep 2 hives at a time, they are very expensive but once you have your setup you are good, but you do have to feed them patties for the winter during the first couple years of winters because there will not be enough honey for them to survive on. We keep them under our fruit trees into about 6 hours of sun to warm them up. It's alot of trial and error and you have to have excluders in your honey super because they will lay brewed and hatch more queens which causes your hives to split. It's a good and a bad thing. We had that happen and ended up with two hives but sometimes isn't easy to deal with. We do it just to keep the population going we love bees but you will lose many hives throughout years so don't feel or beat your self up over it.
 

electrycmonk

_This space intentionally left blank_
Aug 8, 2019
6,820
34,987
897
Happily caught in the 'Denton vortex', Tx
My Coop
My Coop
Does anyone here have bee's?
I know nothing about them but I'd like to get some in the future. Where should I start? What is the average upfront costs and yearly costs? Are they expensive? Do they take a lot of work? Where should they be kept?
I'll be sure to do lots of research before getting any, I just wanted to start here.
find your local bee keeping org site or association too.
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
36,020
176,068
1,661
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
Does anyone here have bee's?
I know nothing about them but I'd like to get some in the future. Where should I start? What is the average upfront costs and yearly costs? Are they expensive? Do they take a lot of work? Where should they be kept?
I'll be sure to do lots of research before getting any, I just wanted to start here.
Start by checking your state laws on beekeeping. Many states require a permit to have honeybees.

There are much greater options now than there were years ago.

You are far enough south that you have entirely different concerns than I have. You should not have any trouble over wintering bees but may have severe mite problems. Africanized bees may also be a problem.

If your desire is honey production, get Italian bees.

Check out and join a local beekeeping organization. Volunteer to help a local beekeeper and try to get one as a mentor.

Florida Beekeeping Organizations

If you have specific questions, I will try to answer them.
 

MissMonty

Songster
5 Years
Sep 12, 2015
497
986
186
Dayton, OH
Its best to keep multiple hives versus just one. So start out with at least 2 hives. The up front costs getting the bees and equipment is really the hard part and the most expensive part. We just paid for 2 packages of bees that comes with a queen and it was $150 per package and you have to reserve them now for spring. So I paid for mine and I'll get them end of April (pick up will vary by location).

Then you have to buy all the hives and such. So to start you can probably expect to spend about $1,000 between all the bees, hives, smoker, etc but once you have the bees and equipment the on going expenses are very low. Its not like chickens where you have to buy bags of feed regularly.

Also don't expect to get a lot of honey your first year so most likely you won't get a big harvest to help offset your investment right away.

Personally, I think bees are awesome and well worth the investment BUT there is a pretty steep start up cost with them so make sure it is something you're passionate about. I'd look on youtube, there is TONS about bees on there and I borrowed every book possible from my local library to help me get started :)
 

electrycmonk

_This space intentionally left blank_
Aug 8, 2019
6,820
34,987
897
Happily caught in the 'Denton vortex', Tx
My Coop
My Coop
we started our research into this field 3-4 years ago. this past summer *WAS* going to be the "dive in" time....... we figured the year after we got the coop stable and stuff.....

We are connected to our local bee keepers .org group and in county wise ones too. So, its not a total loss. we just plan to get a look-see in the spring.....
 

LizzzyJo

Crowing
Dec 14, 2018
1,736
4,477
307
The Great Black Swamp, Ohio
Start out by chatting with your local apiary. Local bees do much better because they’re bred for your climate.

It is a very expensive hobby. First two years with two hives can be around $800 or so. Hive death is a real issue, so you can expect to be buying new bees every few years. Half assing anything will lead to hive death, so don’t try to pinch pennies.

The time investment is low - maybe 5 days a year total.

Do it for the environment, not the honey and you will be very satisfied!

Get and read 2-3 books before buying. Buy hive boxes with bees already in them from the apiary.

Good luck!
 

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