Best antibiotic for respiratory issues?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Celiandy, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. Celiandy

    Celiandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The feed stores around here have duramycin. I've heard a lot of great things about Tylan. Does anyone have a preference or some wisdom about which would be better?

    Is this a good deal? - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00061MQIC/ref=cm_rdp_product

    It
    seems ridiculously expensive, but maybe worth it?? Is there a place that you've gotten it for cheap? I'd rather do the water soluble than the shots.

    I'd love any thoughts or suggestions. It is to treat my flock of shaky headed sneezers.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    I have used vetRx with amazing results--just for the sniffles or whatever...Tylan is another great option for a more powerful effect and it's an antibiotic...
     
  3. Buck Creek Chickens

    Buck Creek Chickens Have Incubator, Will Hatch

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    Foy's Respiratory & More Powder 100 gr. $32.95, Vet RX, or Foy's Tylamox Powder 100 gr. $34.95 Contains 20 mg. of Tylan and 10 mg. of Amoxicillin.
    I've used these in the past and all work great.
     
  4. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it will depend to some extent what the respritory issue is, if it is viral, the antibiotics typically only help with any secondary infections.
     
  5. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    You're better off to just put cinnamon in thier water
     
  6. ND

    ND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm a fan of Denagard for CRD issues.
    It's costly initially (cost about $50 shipped, I could only find it online), but the bottle will last....'forever'. (depends on flock size, but will last my flock of 20 birds a year. Treatment+preventative monthly)
    Although it's used off label in the US, in areas it's labeled for chickens, there is no egg withdrawal. I don't toss eggs. That'd be your personal choice, I suppose.

    Know that respiratory issues in chickens are generally chronic, carrier diseases. They may 'get better', but be infected and be able to infect healthy birds, pass it in hatching eggs, and can have 'flare ups' again under stress. (molt, cold, heat, etc)
    Without specific testing, you won't know exactly what they have, but usually, the outcome/treatment is the same no matter what it is, exactly.
    Many people will cull any showing symptoms or cull the entire flock. (the only way to break the cycle and get a 'clean flock' again) But, then care has to be taken to not have the clean flock infected... which means strict biosecurity. Many backyard flocks are CRD positive (some without knowing) and many just treat symptoms and deal with it that way. If your plans for your flock is just eggs and pets, there's no reason to not treat them. If you want to sell chicks, birds, hatching eggs, (or show) etc... you will potentially be selling infected, carrier birds that will infect other flocks. No bird should leave your property alive.


    Tylan is your next best bet... but for the money (and results), Denagard tops it by a lot in my experience.
    Most other things labeled to treat CRD issues may help *some* with some symptoms, but seem to fail at getting the flock totally symptom free entirely...and staying that way for long.

    If you want to treat the flock... I really, really suggest the Denagard, even tho the initial purchase is a bit pricey. Per dose wise, it IS cheaper per bird... and the monthly "preventative" treatment helps keep pretty much all flareups (for us) gone.
     
  7. Celiandy

    Celiandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info everyone! How do you know it it is a respiratory disease vs just some sneezes/congestion that will pass?

    Quote:
     
  8. ND

    ND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, chickens don't get 'colds', they get respiratory diseases...

    Having said that, it's possible that there is some other irritant causing random symptoms I suppose. Extremely dusty coop where they are constantly inhaling irritating particles?
    Exposure to some other irritant... chemical? Some cases of gape worms can cause choking/sneezing/etc...
    I suppose it's possible that one might have pneumonia or something... but if you start talking about an entire flock being affected? Is it spreading? Any breaches in biosecurity in the last 30 days or so? (including tracking possible contaminates home)

    When one starts talking about treating an entire flock (or large number within a flock) for respiratory symptoms ("colds"), the likelihood is great that it's CRD related... especially if it's severe enough that one is considering antibiotics. A flock won't just randomly get "congestion" particularly. That's symptomatic of CRD... OR severe environmental inhaled irritants. Perhaps I'm wrongly assuming that you've personally ruled out inhaled irritants given that you're inquiring about antibiotics...which won't help if it's potentially from inhaling irritants. [​IMG]

    Anyway, I don't believe there's a benign cause of congestion ever... and I wouldn't treat with anything for a "random" sneeze every now and then. Usually it's fairly clear if it's some random sneeze to be ignored, or if it's respiratory illness. [​IMG]
     
  9. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    LS-50 and LS-200 for CRD trat the water hands down best meds I have used. as ND has stated make sure your dealing with a respitory problem before you treat.
     
  10. Celiandy

    Celiandy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks everyone for your suggestions and thoughts. I thought about the environmental triggers, yesterday I changed all the bedding and started using a different brand of food. It's possible that they've been getting a bit of mold with our damp weather, but it seems strange that it would effect so many of them. The symptoms are really mild. There is really just the one silkie that is a bit flemmy, the others just shake their heads now and then and sneeze every once in awhile. It is only the silkies and silkie mixes that are doing it. The cochins seem to be a bit tougher. I guess I will wait awhile longer and see if they get over it. If not, maybe I'll bring one in to get tested to see if it's anything serious.
     

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