1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

BIRDFU INFORMATION JUST OUT!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Glenda Heywoodo, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    [​IMG]

    The highly contagious, fast-moving and über-deadly H5N2 avian influenza virus annihilated poultry flocks in Canada, Kansas, Washington, Oregon, California, Minnesota, Missouri, Idaho, Arkansas and Wisconsin in 2015. While Bird Flu has primarily affected commercial poultry populations in the US in recent years, this following information is intended to arm you with the tools you need to help protect your flock from Avian Influenza and the many other diseases that could affect your pet chickens.
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2015/03/backyard-chickens-avian-influenza-what.html
    The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.
    Anyone involved with poultry production, from the small backyard to the large commercial producer, should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. To facilitate such a review, a biosecurity self-assessment and educational materials can be found at http://www.uspoultry.org/animal_husbandry/intro.cfm
    In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.
    Additional background
    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)— the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

    #
    USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H7 Avian Influenza in a Commercial Flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee

    Last Modified: Mar 6, 2017
    Print
    Contacts:
    Donna Karlsons, 301-851-4107
    Donna.L.Karlsons@aphis.usda.gov
    Lyndsay Cole, 970-494-7410
    Lyndsay.M.Cole@aphis.usda.gov
    March 5, 2017, Washington – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) of North American wild bird lineage in a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States this year. The flock of 73,500 is located within the Mississippi flyway. Samples from the affected flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at Tennessee’s Kord Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa. Virus isolation is ongoing, and NVSL expects to characterize the neuraminidase protein, or “N-type”, of the virus within 48 hours.

    APHIS is working closely with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

    The Tennessee Department of Agriculture is working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure that they are taking the proper precautions to prevent illness and contain disease spread. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

    As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

    USDA will be informing the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as well as international trading partners of this finding. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern.
    These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

    All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock

    Additional background
    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)— the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.
    #

    USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).


    MARCH 5,2017 AVIAN INFLUENZA IN LINCOLN COUNTY TENNESSEE.

    APHIS IS FOLLOWING THE OUTBREAK

    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/newsroom/news/sa_by_date/sa-2017/hpai-tn


    [​IMG]
    Questions for APHIS VS?
    Contact us

    STAY CONNECTED:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    SUBSCRIBER SERVICES:
    Manage Preferences | Unsubscribe | Help

    Powered by

    [​IMG]

    The word "biosecurity" refers to an overall system for protecting chickens from infectious diseases. Each backyard chicken keeper will approach biosecurity differently based on personal risk tolerances, but implementing even the most basic biosecurity measures significantly limits potential health threats to a flock.
    [​IMG]

    Rodents are a nuisance and a health hazard for for backyard chickens and controlling them requires a multi-faceted plan of attack, so let's roll one out!​
     
  2. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

    5,000
    1,189
    366
    Jan 14, 2012
    Conway SC

    [​IMG]
    Questions for APHIS VS?
    Contact us

    STAY CONNECTED:
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    SUBSCRIBER SERVICES:
    Manage Preferences | Unsubscribe | Help

    Powered by

    [​IMG]

    The word "biosecurity" refers to an overall system for protecting chickens from infectious diseases. Each backyard chicken keeper will approach biosecurity differently based on personal risk tolerances, but implementing even the most basic biosecurity measures significantly limits potential health threats to a flock.
    [​IMG]

    Rodents are a nuisance and a health hazard for for backyard chickens and controlling them requires a multi-faceted plan of attack, so let's roll one out!​

    Probably means different things to all of us. To me it means a loss of money. 2 years ago it cause the Auctions to close down, I had to quickly sell about 1200 chickens before the Auctions shut down. I did not actually loose money, I just did not get to make the money I could have---if it did not exist. Now with the new Auction open a hour from me----prices are good, and I was thinking about cranking back up-------Then Bam----more bird-flu found. Now I think I will just go fishing!
     
  3. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    Well that is one reason I put this on.
    I know this was found in Tennessee and may not come this far down,
    but Hey!! Southern poultry folks need take warning.
    Sorry, what I would do is contact the owner of the Auction house
    to see if they have heard any thing.
     
  4. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

    5,000
    1,189
    366
    Jan 14, 2012
    Conway SC
    I am in contact with the owner almost daily----I work at the Auction(Volunteer)----helping him to get it going. I made and keep a FB Page going for his Auction. Its to early yet. Here is my thoughts. If I get a 1000 chicks/chickens going--growing out----hatching 100's a week and all the Auctions in my area shuts down again-------the easiest way to explain it is like this----Lets say you go to work, and it cost you a lot each week to work(feed) but its going to be 6 months before you can get your pay and recoop your expense ----but you work real hard for 3,4 or 5 months----then BAM the company goes bankrupt(bird-flu closes down your Auctions)----that's a bad feeling---even if you can get your expense back(selling the flock way early and cheap)---all that time was wasted---no pay for your work. Sooooo being they found a confirmed case of bird-flu in Tennessee-----I am thinking the smart thing to do right now is Go Fishing until there is no scares---ever how long that is going to be!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  5. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,297
    357
    191
    Jul 19, 2016
    Iowa
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  6. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    I UNDERSTAND COMPLETELY
    THAT URL WILL KEEP YOU POSTED
     
  7. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    I PUT THIS IN BIGGER TYPE AS IT IS IMPORTANT INFORMATION.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    here is where you report bird death and check on how government is taking care of bird flu

    All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock
     
  9. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

    982
    85
    106
    Dec 19, 2016
    Cassville Missouri
    WELL THIS REPLY CAME ON
    OLD ENGLISH GAME BOARD ON FACE BOOK.
    A fellow was trying to buy some old English games.


    He was told this:
    Austin Agan Hate to say it but you can't transport birds in Alabama fight now because of avian influenza
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by