biting rottie

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by pocanontas12, Jul 16, 2016.

  1. pocanontas12

    pocanontas12 New Egg

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    I have a almost 9 month rottweiler. He like to jump on me and start biting if i turn my back he will jump on my back and still bite me.
    He can be good for a couple of weeks then out of the blue he turns on me. HELP
     
  2. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Training - if he doesn't respond to training, I'd send him to a home that can establish dominance over him. If that doesn't work, it's okay to cull dogs to - maybe even more than livestock since it'd take a hell of a chicken to kill someone, whereas a mediocre dog could get the job done relatively easy. Biting dogs are a danger to everyone - especially kids, elderly, etc..
     
  3. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Consult a veterinary behaviorist immediately. This is not something people can help you either over the Internet. A behaviorist will be able to determine why the dog is acting this way and can help develop a training plan to suit the dog's needs. Stay far away from dominance training methods. I've personally seen dogs turn aggressive to owners that use this method and using it on an already aggressive dog is a recipe for disaster.

    If you look for trainers over veterinary behaviorists, I recommend finding one that uses positive reinforcement and has a history of working successfully with dogs such as yours. Poor training can be very difficult to undue and can cause a large amount of damage in a relatively short time period.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  4. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First, throw all the talk about dominance out the window. If a dog is truly dominant, getting in a confrontation would end badly for the human, even with a 9 month old pup.

    In all likelyhood, it's simply an ill-mannered untrained pup. What training does he have and what mental exercise does he get every day? What exercise does he get daily? What is his schedule like? What are your expectations for his behavior that you've enforced since he was a puppy? Is he an indoor dog or an outdoor dog?

    Definitely get a trainer or behaviorist involved. Talk to people that you know with well-behaved pets and find out who they went to. Start at least a basic obedience class sooner than later.
     
  5. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    I definitely agree with Dainerra! My first thought is that the dog is playing a bit too rough and has some bad manners, but there is no way I can judge that through a post online. He could be acting in fear, territorial aggression, etc. that's where the trainer comes in because they can tease apart the underlying reason for the behavior and help you fix it from there.
     
  6. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @pocanontas12 [​IMG]Don't be afraid to use a muzzle every once in a while if he's out of control! Just don't leave it on too long. I use Don Sullivan's methods, and that works for me. You decide what method you want to use, though. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016
  7. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    If he does this only when you turn your back, don't turn your back. He is more than likely testing his boundaries and is seeing if he can be ALPHA.

    Like others have said consult someone appropriate.

    I see in your avatar the dog has a pinch collar on and is tied to a chain. A pinch collar IS NOT a "tie out" collar and is used in handler training. (not a great method). The issue leaving it on a tethered dog without a handler is the collar will make corrections at the incorrect moments causing serious confusion to the dog.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016
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  8. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. You may want to consider an e-collar for when he bites, but I'm not sure on that because I have never used one myself.
     
  9. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Absolutely do not use an electric collar on a dog exhibiting reactivity. This is never an appropriate training method for a reactive dog.

    Please consult a trainer. The money spent on a good trainer can prevent a lot of psychological damage.
     
  10. OSDad

    OSDad Out Of The Brooder

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    X2 on the ecollar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! DO NOT USE AN E COLLAR TO CORRECT THIS BEHAVIOUR.

    An e collar used properly corrects a dog for a behavior or task he already understands. it is not used to punish bad behavior. Most people don't understand that the dog needs to be trained (collar conditioned) to understand why the collar is correcting them.

    I train bird hunting dogs and an e collar in invaluable for training as I can make a correction from 1/2 mile away once the dog understands what I am requesting of it. A lot of people have the misconception an e collar "electrocutes" the dog. If used properly the dog should only feel slight tingling when the correction is used.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016

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