Blood in poop

jolenesdad

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I feel like I’ve identified one after getting to monitor them closely in a smaller pen. Any reason to separate while treating the whole group?
 

Eggcessive

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Only separate if you want to give her more attention or feed her the undiluted Corid. She may be more comfortable with her flock. If she is acting sick, go ahead and separate. The main thing with prevention is to keep the coop as dry and clean as possible. You cannot really disinfect a coop or wven the roosts. Dry is good. Stirring the bedding and adding new pine shavings often are good moves. Good air circulation can help with keeping it dry. Clean and wash waterers daily and raise feeders and waterers to shoulder height to lessen the possibility of droppings getting into them.
 

jolenesdad

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Only separate if you want to give her more attention or feed her the undiluted Corid. She may be more comfortable with her flock. If she is acting sick, go ahead and separate. The main thing with prevention is to keep the coop as dry and clean as possible. You cannot really disinfect a coop or wven the roosts. Dry is good. Stirring the bedding and adding new pine shavings often are good moves. Good air circulation can help with keeping it dry. Clean and wash waterers daily and raise feeders and waterers to shoulder height to lessen the possibility of droppings getting into them.
I doubled the bedding and will address the area they’re sleeping daily. There’s a ten or more foot overhang on the roof but I’m wondering if rain with a cold front made it in the coop. I’ll keep a close watch.
 

Kiki

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Thank you!!! They should go to 13 weeks so we should be past this hump!
I'm just reading through your thread now so this might already have been mentioned but they can catch this at any age. It doesn't only happen to chicks or young chickens.
 

jolenesdad

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Thanks to my BYC friends I had no losses in the last 24 hours and everyone’s looking good.

so I’m a tad confused. Do I assume these chicks are shedding extra cocci into the environment? Should I keep them confined (they have plenty of room for their age/size) until it’s under control so they are not entering areas other chickens go? should I prevent them from entering the areas of the range area that are wet still where I assume they picked it up?

do I assume my laying flock of 25 has immunities? Do I need to be cautious of my shoes from coop to coop?

before I started handling the meat birds yesterday I confined the other adult birds (they’re in coop/run combos in incredibly dry environments) and haven’t entered their coop yet. Should I use different shoes or do a dip between environments?
 

ChickenCanoe

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You could easily have brought the protozoa or its oocysts in on your shoes. It can be brought in on feeders, water founts and many other pieces of equipment.
Your adult flock has long ago developed resistance. The reason chicks are so vulnerable is that the first time they've been exposed, they haven't had an opportunity to develop resistance.
I know some people will put a piece of garden soil in their brooders to give slight exposure. That may be of some help. There are 7 species of coccidia (eimeria) that affect chickens, 5 that affect turkeys and one species in ducks. Not all species are in every environment. Should your or anyone's birds that have resistance to the species on a property be sold and move to a property with a different species, that is when adults can be affected by an outbreak of coccidiosis. As long as they are responding to the Corid, you are probably out of the woods and can continue to allow them to forage.
Not to nitpick but another point I'd like to clarify is that the pathogen causing coccidiosis is the protozoa coccidia, not cocci. Cocci is any spherical shaped microorganism - usually bacteria.
 

jolenesdad

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You could easily have brought the protozoa or its oocysts in on your shoes. It can be brought in on feeders, water founts and many other pieces of equipment.
Your adult flock has long ago developed resistance. The reason chicks are so vulnerable is that the first time they've been exposed, they haven't had an opportunity to develop resistance.
I know some people will put a piece of garden soil in their brooders to give slight exposure. That may be of some help. There are 7 species of coccidia (eimeria) that affect chickens, 5 that affect turkeys and one species in ducks. Not all species are in every environment. Should your or anyone's birds that have resistance to the species on a property be sold and move to a property with a different species, that is when adults can be affected by an outbreak of coccidiosis. As long as they are responding to the Corid, you are probably out of the woods and can continue to allow them to forage.
Not to nitpick but another point I'd like to clarify is that the pathogen causing coccidiosis is the protozoa coccidia, not cocci. Cocci is any spherical shaped microorganism - usually bacteria.
Please nitpick!!! Thank you.

after a week old, all my birds are in the same barn, with different coop/run combos. I keep a pair of chicken shoes that I only wear on my property. So when an adult builds a resistance to the species of coccidia in their direct environment, is that like an all or nothing? Is it not necessarily that there is a higher concentration of it somewhere, but just that it is there in the first place and the chick or chicks were exposed to it without building immunities first?

I do a large chunk of soil and grass from a week old in the brooder and grow out pens until they start going out into grass. Looking back, I don’t think I took much of this from an area inside the chicken paddocks because I wanted to dig up some weeds in a specific area. That’s a clear error on my end.
 

ChickenCanoe

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I have never done the piece of sod in the brooder thing myself but I don't think it is a bad idea.
It has been almost 10 years since I used medicated feed. I bought it once on purpose and once by mistake. I've bought Corid once and used it twice but it eventually expired and I threw it away a couple years ago. I think the next time I get to the feed store I'll buy some again since I will be having chicks hatch beginning next week. It is always good to have some on hand and the feed store by my house always has product that is already expired and the next closest feed store that has fresher product is in the next state.
I have done 3 things that I think have kept coccidiosis at bay all these years. A probiotic powder (Gro2Max) goes into chicks first water when they hatch and then weekly for a while. I keep bedding bone dry and feeders full which limits the amount of time they spend picking up bits (feces) from the bedding.
The bacteria and yeasts in the Gro2Max tend to populate the intestinal walls giving the coccidia fewer attachment loci.
Coccidia is unable to complete its lifecycle without moisture.
It is really difficult to tell if there are different concentrations in different locations.
Almost any animal with soil contact, including humans, is vulnerable to one or multiple species of eimeria.
 
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