Bloody Spots in Poo

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sk8inChick(en), Nov 4, 2012.

  1. Sk8inChick(en)

    Sk8inChick(en) Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2011
    The Show-Me State
    Yesterday I found some chicken poo in the yard that had a significant amout of blood in it. It was also runny. I have been checking on them frequently since, and this morning, when I cleaned off the roosting board, I saw some more poo with blood in it. This time it wasn't runny, but there were still spots blood in it.

    I know that abnormal poo can be a sign of illness, but that is the only thing I've noticed. My pullet who is laying has stopped, but she quit about a month ago, coinciding with the deacrease in daylight, so I assumed that it was just her "winter break."

    If anyone can give me some information about possible causes for this, I would greatly appreciate it. I do have a link to a poop chart, and I haven't looked at it yet, but I know that blood can be reason to suspet that something isn't right.

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    The disease that folks usually think about with bloody poo (not just a shed intestinal lining, which is mushy and not very much blood) is coccidiosis.

    However, there is also necrotic enteritis:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    diagnosis charts at bottom

    coccidiosis:
    http://www.clemson.edu/public/lph/ahp/disease_links/images/coccidia.pdf

    Treatment for coccidiosis is Corid or Sulmet (Corid treats more strains, available in the cattle section of feed store).

    Also capillaria (a type of worms) can cause hemorrhaging in the intestines:
    http://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/resource000811_rep844.pdf

    Given that the only sign is bloody droppings I'd treat with Corid and you should see improvement within 24 hours if coccidiosis is what it was. I give Corid 9.6% liquid, 9.5 ml per gallon of drinking water mixing new solution daily for 5-7 days.

    Don't administer vitamins during Corid administration, as it is a thiamine blocker.

    Some vets will do a fecal test for coccidiosis and worms for a small fee (I personally feel that it is always helpful to get a poo test if you aren't sure of what you are dealing with but false negatives are possible with the fecal float for worms).

    I won't raise chicks without a bottle of Corid around. Yours are older but if immunocompromised or on new soil coccidiosis can occur (they should have built up an immunity to it, in other words, as it is usually a disease of 8 weeks and younger).
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2012
  3. Sk8inChick(en)

    Sk8inChick(en) Chillin' With My Peeps

    631
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    May 12, 2011
    The Show-Me State
    Thank you so much!

    I think I will get some Corid and get the test from our vet.

    I notice that you said something about shedding of the intstinal lining? The blood is kind of, well, thick and gelatinous and there isn't that much of it. Could this just be something that occurs naturally once in a while?

    Again, thank you so much for your help! It is much appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2012
  4. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

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