Bobcat won't leave my chickens alone

Nov 11, 2020
1,610
2,749
286
West Virginia
We have stopped them from free-ranging for 3 weeks already, but the bobcat still returns every night, our coop is very secure, so no predators have been able to break in. But our neighbors free range their chickens, meaning the bobcat still returns every night, and some days. We will try to keep them on a schedule, but our schedules vary differently every day. We also have other pets, such as barn cats, dogs, and many others that are being threatened by its presence. Thank you for the advice, and I will try it out!
We've had Bob cats here for as long as I can remember close to 50 yrs and they avoid humans. Never had any cats or dogs go missing here but I have heard they will kill a cat over territory for food (outdoor cats).
 

mowin

Crowing
Jun 17, 2018
1,519
3,085
317
Upstate NY
S

Standard size modern or old english game chickens are called large fowl. Cackle sells the Old English(see link) https://www.cacklehatchery.com/product/gold-duckwing-standard-old-english-chicken/
I don't think you understood my post. You recommend the OP going to large fowl instead of standard chickens. Not sure how that is going to help the OP's situation? A bobcat will easily take down large fowl, and the OP wouldn't be any better for changing.
 
Nov 11, 2020
1,610
2,749
286
West Virginia
I don't think you understood my post. You recommend the OP going to large fowl instead of standard chickens. Not sure how that is going to help the OP's situation? A bobcat will easily take down large fowl, and the OP wouldn't be any better for changing
The only way the OP can protect their chickens is to lock them up because killing this bob cat won't stop its offspring or others from coming. Adult predators teach their young how and where to hunt and bring them straight to our flocks. It helps to study predators and the many different breeds of chickens we can raise to find the one best suited for us.I keep mine confined so I chose a breed that can handle it better.
 

CanadaEh

Songster
May 31, 2018
491
858
186
Canada
Hello all, I have a flock of about 31 girls, during the day they are free ranged, and during the night I put them away. And at about 12am, a bobcat killed two of my chickens, and left them they're without eating them. This same bobcat, we have caught killing 5 more of my chickens at different times, and returning the next night to try and eat them (of course, we had already removed them). We have gotten inches away from this animal, and it does not flee. We also have a permit to kill the bobcat, but am unsure if there is a better way to get rid of it. Any advice?
You kill a predator - another one will move into his territory in a shot while.
You give him 5000V shock from electric fence - he will know to better stay way away from your chickens while still guarding his much larger territory from others.
We have had repeated bobcat sightings couple winters ago that ended up with 11 chickens killed. He also was bold enough to come back for his kills night after that. No bobcat (or coons, or squires) sighting since electric fence was installed for 2 years now.
 

ajacobscrouse

In the Brooder
Jan 8, 2022
4
2
11
Wisconsin
You kill a predator - another one will move into his territory in a shot while.
You give him 5000V shock from electric fence - he will know to better stay way away from your chickens while still guarding his much larger territory from others.
We have had repeated bobcat sightings couple winters ago that ended up with 11 chickens killed. He also was bold enough to come back for his kills night after that. No bobcat (or coons, or squires) sighting since electric fence was installed for 2 years now.
Just remember to always keep it activated when you're not around. Predators are smart and will always test the fence and look for weak points. I learned this in dealing with Black Bear. Had some ducks setting on some eggs in their coop. Just a couple of days away from hatching. Turned off the fence around their pen to go in and check on them. Went away for half an hour. When I came back all of my ducks, including the broodies we're panicking at the gate. I had forgotten to turn the fence back on in that half hour, and in that same time, a bear got into their pen and used their potential babies as a snack. When I got up to the gate, I could see the bear sitting behind the pen. It looked like it was almost snickering, like that stupid dog from Duck Hunter.
 

CanadaEh

Songster
May 31, 2018
491
858
186
Canada
the must be one hungry bear or you have too weak of a charger at least for a bear. The one we have is for horses and the sparking length is up to 1/2" - I have been shocked through multiple levels of clothes and it is not pleasant. We don't have many bears though.
 

ajacobscrouse

In the Brooder
Jan 8, 2022
4
2
11
Wisconsin
the must be one hungry bear or you have too weak of a charger at least for a bear. The one we have is for horses and the sparking length is up to 1/2" - I have been shocked through multiple levels of clothes and it is not pleasant. We don't have many bears though.
I left for half an hour and forgot to turn the fence back on while away... That's my fault. Always had the fence on around my hives, and they left my bees alone this year. Had an incident last year, though.
 
Nov 11, 2020
1,610
2,749
286
West Virginia
My coop sits under a canopy of trees against the woods but its close to our house . This helps to discourage large predators.I'm sure an electric fence would help but bob cats can climb trees and jump over some fences.
 

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