BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Arielle

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 19, 2011
16,722
616
411
Massachusetts, USA
@ tony -- why use such a large male? and do you keep breeding stock to produce the males?? THey look HUGE compared to the leghorn hens. Just curious.
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,337
313
Midlands, South Carolina
Excellent question. Hatchery Minorcas have two things in common with standard birds. They are black and have white earlobes, that's it. I guess bottom line is I in some way want to keep the traditional type alive. They were very popular prior to the "leghorn age" I assure you it's not based on economics although I farm for a living.
I like to hear that approach. Standard bred Minorca, from what I understand have become a bit bottlenecked. Hatchery Minorca are hardly Minorca anymore. If you are successful, they could prove to be a solid contribution over all. I would love to see some good typed Rose Combed Whites and buffs around.

I like the breed. If I could add one, it would be on the list.
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,337
313
Midlands, South Carolina
I have read that the egg laying comes from the father's side of genetics. Does anyone know if this is true/documented in some way?
Egg laying genetics is more family influence. It is a collection of sorts. There is not a single gene that makes a bird a top performer. It is a compilation of genes.

The family behind a female or a male is what has the most influence.

That said, it has been understood to prefer sons of top performing females. The male has more influence on the flock overall, so he may be the most important. Developing the commercial strains that make up our crosses included testing and proving the sires. The sires that produced better producing daughters on average were the birds kept.

Just because an individual performs, does not necessarily mean that the offspring will.

Selection is on many points over a length of time where the traits that make for good performers is collected and concentrated over lengths of time in a given family. You make the most and fastest progress by line breeding. Crossing two performing groups, provides the added benefit of vigor.
 

bmvf

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 7, 2014
126
34
91
Annville, PA
My Dark Cornish chicks have changed dramatically since just this morning!
But I expected it. When I pulled them from their box, they were quite demur and fearless= almost catatonic. I dipped their little beaks into the water mixed with electrolytes and vitamins and they began to eat the little crumbles and drinking lots of the water. They seemed to have no fear of me at all. Now that they have their 'land-legs', it's another story. When I go near, they act like I'm an eagle coming in for the kill. They dart about like crazy, screaming for all they're worth.
No fatalities!!!

To me, that's a good sign. When I move around where I can see them undetected, they are jumping and fritting about, taking time to eat/drink and back to zooming around the brooder. They are finally winding down and many are sprawled out under the heat lamps, almost looking dead but I see the occasional twitch.

I might run over and write a REVIEW about them..."They were so friendly at first and now they hate me so I will just hate them back!" Then give them 1/2 star.


Turk
Same with my NH's... although they don't act like an eagle is coming to kill them but rather a 20 month old little boy with no fear!

I haven't seen chicks waste feed like these do!
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,337
313
Midlands, South Carolina
@gjensen It's not about money, but I think you know that. If I was more economical I would also just buy all my veggies. But I wouldn't trade sinking my hands into soil for the world. It is more real when it comes from your own labors.
This chicken business is many things to me~ it brings things to a level I have been yearning for for years.

Interesting about the NH, I had no idea they were new vogue so to speak. There must be a balance in fast to flesh and too fast to flesh, isn't there? Very fast growth would require greater resources but too slow is also a strain on resources.

I covet your Catalana, lol...pretty sure you know that too. I would be sick with worry if they were what I learned on but perhaps they are in my future.

You are a great, level-headed, experienced voice for this thread. I hope you continue to find reasons to contribute.

M
Often the faster maturing bird is more feed efficient.

Yes the NH fell off the map. The interest in them now is new. It is a fad of sorts. Before I could not even find anyone interested in them. The few long time breeders preferred bantams. Well bred NHs pretty much disappeared.

It is a shame. I think the NH and the Delaware SHOULD fit what many want out of their birds today. And they still could be. The potential is there.
 

thedragonlady

Crowing
7 Years
Feb 6, 2012
3,410
557
268
Camden,S.C.
I will second Arielle's suggestion of thedragonlady~ just look at this juvenile! He's beautiful and she doesn't put up with any guff so I'm sure her birds are the gentle of the gentle.

M


Thank you! And no, I don't put up with any guff, especially from bad tempered birds,other varmits, or people. I have never had problems with bad acting cockerels, or cock birds, probably because it is firmly embedded in my mind that I am THE MOTHER, and they are the CHICKEN, be it friend, or soup. They have a choice, and I make that very clear.

This chick is carrying 3 crosses to my imported cock bird, Monty. He will be about 14-15 lbs at 2 1/2 years old. He has been bred for good temperament due to that. He is happily living in Texas, with people who expect him to behave, so he will.
 

LindaB220

Crowing
6 Years
Aug 23, 2013
6,179
879
341
Portland/Vancouver area
My Dark Cornish chicks have changed dramatically since just this morning!
But I expected it. When I pulled them from their box, they were quite demur and fearless= almost catatonic. I dipped their little beaks into the water mixed with electrolytes and vitamins and they began to eat the little crumbles and drinking lots of the water. They seemed to have no fear of me at all. Now that they have their 'land-legs', it's another story. When I go near, they act like I'm an eagle coming in for the kill. They dart about like crazy, screaming for all they're worth.
No fatalities!!!

To me, that's a good sign. When I move around where I can see them undetected, they are jumping and fritting about, taking time to eat/drink and back to zooming around the brooder. They are finally winding down and many are sprawled out under the heat lamps, almost looking dead but I see the occasional twitch.

I might run over and write a REVIEW about them..."They were so friendly at first and now they hate me so I will just hate them back!" Then give them 1/2 star.


Turk
Give them time. And they can be liike my 8.5 wk old girls. Still run like crazy.
That's a hatchery bird.
 
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thedragonlady

Crowing
7 Years
Feb 6, 2012
3,410
557
268
Camden,S.C.
My Dark Cornish chicks have changed dramatically since just this morning!
But I expected it. When I pulled them from their box, they were quite demur and fearless= almost catatonic. I dipped their little beaks into the water mixed with electrolytes and vitamins and they began to eat the little crumbles and drinking lots of the water. They seemed to have no fear of me at all. Now that they have their 'land-legs', it's another story. When I go near, they act like I'm an eagle coming in for the kill. They dart about like crazy, screaming for all they're worth.
No fatalities!!!

To me, that's a good sign. When I move around where I can see them undetected, they are jumping and fritting about, taking time to eat/drink and back to zooming around the brooder. They are finally winding down and many are sprawled out under the heat lamps, almost looking dead but I see the occasional twitch.

I might run over and write a REVIEW about them..."They were so friendly at first and now they hate me so I will just hate them back!" Then give them 1/2 star.


Turk
If you will moisten your finger, dip it in chick starter, then make pecking motions, the chicks will run to your hand. Do this, and you will have friendly birds, not birds who fear your hand. Chicks instinctively fear anything looming over them, so speak first, then make the packing motions with food on your finger. You'll see a big difference.
 

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