BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Turk Raphael

Songster
5 Years
May 14, 2014
917
265
170
The Blue Grass State
Thank you! And no, I don't put up with any guff, especially from bad tempered birds,other varmits, or people. I have never had problems with bad acting cockerels, or cock birds, probably because it is firmly embedded in my mind that I am THE MOTHER, and they are the CHICKEN, be it friend, or soup. They have a choice, and I make that very clear.

This chick is carrying 3 crosses to my imported cock bird, Monty. He will be about 14-15 lbs at 2 1/2 years old. He has been bred for good temperament due to that. He is happily living in Texas, with people who expect him to behave, so he will.
He is a very handsome fella! I'm interested in relatively large birds and I'm curious about the longevity of a bird such as the one pictured...assuming excellent care and proper living conditions...everything being optimum.

Thanks in advance
 

thedragonlady

Crowing
7 Years
Feb 6, 2012
3,410
557
268
Camden,S.C.
He is a very handsome fella! I'm interested in relatively large birds and I'm curious about the longevity of a bird such as the one pictured...assuming excellent care and proper living conditions...everything being optimum.

Thanks in advance
Well bred, well fed, Orp LF should still be healthy at 6-8 years old.The hens will produce fewer eggs, but any hen who fits the SOP, and produces well for that long should be bred from. The older hens are the crown jewels in a breeding program.Many a promising pullet has fallen apart at age 2. Those that make it there, are bred from here.

All my critters seem to live a long time . I had a rather well known black Silkie hen, Mamma, who was still winning Show Ch. at age 12. I don't keep many. Just a few, very good ones, and I take very good care of them.
 

Turk Raphael

Songster
5 Years
May 14, 2014
917
265
170
The Blue Grass State
If you will moisten your finger, dip it in chick starter, then make pecking motions, the chicks will run to your hand. Do this, and you will have friendly birds, not birds who fear your hand. Chicks instinctively fear anything looming over them, so speak first, then make the packing motions with food on your finger. You'll see a big difference.
Thank you for the advice...it's very much appreciated. I was actually kidding about writing a review. I've seen some silly ones based upon similar circumstances.

Turk
 

seventreesfarm

Songster
7 Years
Jun 14, 2012
476
27
136
Everson, WA
I was just out doing my evening chicken check, and spent a little longer just staring at everyone, trying to get a 'vibe' from my pullets, comparing them to their parents, thinking about who I want to pen with who next....

They all just gave me that beady eye like 'uh oh, she's making plans again'.

Such good advice about keep the best hens as long as possible!

When we were just keeping a flock for egg sales, we'd rotate them out before their 2nd molt and always have upcoming pullets to replace them. Now looking at some of my gals that are over a year old, that I'd normally think of selling or eating, some of them have been crack winter layers, steady, nice quality eggs, not to mention getting close to the look I want. Can't wait to see how their daughters do, especially since I will have a batch with each of my roos to compare.

I also need to get back to tracking feed/production numbers. It's tough when I'm running a mixed flock, but when I track just layers, it's really helpful to see those numbers over a few seasons.
 

southernmomma

Songster
5 Years
Mar 12, 2014
316
28
126
North Louisiana
One of our Blue Andulusian males we are using. We are breeding for production. We don't show. The hens are large and are extremely good layers. They are splashes, not good lacing but again we selected them based on performance , not color.
A much deeper looking bird than I expected. I like the way he looks. He appears tall~ is he?

M
 

Turk Raphael

Songster
5 Years
May 14, 2014
917
265
170
The Blue Grass State
After reading several threads on this great site, I've become convinced that there must be many people, lurkers or those who fear being jumped upon, who are simply interested in breeding chickens for production.

Breeding for egg production has been my life-long hobby and I have never disparaged those who breed strictly for conformation, to the Standard of Perfection, as written by folks who had their ideals met and transcribed long ago and I do not intend to begin here.

In fact, I intend to begin a SOP breeding project in the near future, with a breed that will require considerable dedication and commitment. That being said, I have started this thread for those of us that enjoy the fruits of our labors in egg and meat production and who really don't care if our chickens meet some arbitrary set of rules that can at best, be very subjective.

With egg and meat production....the quality can be seen and tasted. No need for a third party to give us their opinions, with the possible exceptions...if we sell eggs or meat birds, we had better produce quality or our efforts will be in vain.

EDIT: This thread is as much for the SOP folks as anyone. I think they need to realize (many do) that production was the primary reason for having chickens 'back in the day'.
I think this is a good place to bring this post forward. I only had a brief encounter with RON but it was when he welcomed me to the thread and chastised others for failing to do so. I have a very thick skin but many others might not and If Ron never comes back to this thread as he has promised, we might owe it to him to keep the thread as close to the standards he envisioned.

Turk
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,337
313
Midlands, South Carolina
Andalusions should have a high station. The Spanish, obviously, liked birds with a high station. I like the proud look of look of the Spanish breeds. They act how they look to. Well, most of them at least. Concerning type, would an Andalusion be an Andalusion without a high station? They would not be an Andalusion if they had a level back.

I was going to take a moment and comment on dragonlady's birds. I am intimately familiar with them. They are not my style (too much feather for my tastes), but for those that do fancy them, they are excellent birds. They are well bred, healthy, and vigorous. They have very manageable personalities, and are a pleasure to own. They are also more attractive in person, on green grass, than in a picture. They are big beautiful birds. The feather makes them appear larger than what they are, but they are still big birds. Their personalities remind me of my New Hampshire.

Another comment on type. When it comes to pure breeds, I admire good type. Even in production birds, a pure breed should have good type. A mixed breed should have good laying type etc. A flock of well bred birds have consistency concerning type. Production birds do not necessarily have to be as refined concerning color. They should still have good type.
I have a couple old photos of some utility light Sussex on pasture. Their color is not bad, but not necessarily for exhibition. They do have excellent type, and better type than many exhibition birds. If I was to judge between the two, I would certainly have to choose the former.

If we took the time to handle a flock of commercial sex links, we will find a consistency in type. Even among different lines. Feather quality is poor, poor combs, pinched tails, etc. Still excellent laying type. Just nothing other than what is necessary for laying eggs. Then, they are not famous for health and longevity. Something that is important to someone that is concerned with sustainability.

Someone mentioned the topic of crosses a bit ago, and Tony posted some pictures of one. I like traditional simple crosses. Where someone could accommodate two breeds, and do well by them. Also utilize the benefits of the cross. There is a number of possibilities. New Hampshire x Barred Rocks or Delaware, Reds x Light Sussex etc. The offspring make better dual purpose birds than the commercial hybrids. That is if the parents have good size and type. Of course the parents being good layers of big eggs would be important.

Regardless of the purpose, well bred birds are still the goal.
 

LindaB220

Crowing
6 Years
Aug 23, 2013
6,179
879
341
Portland/Vancouver area
I think this is a good place to bring this post forward. I only had a brief encounter with RON but it was when he welcomed me to the thread and chastised others for failing to do so. I have a very thick skin but many others might not and If Ron never comes back to this thread as he has promised, we might owe it to him to keep the thread as close to the standards he envisioned.

Turk
Correct, and I miss Ron. I wish Jason would come on and visit us.
 
Top Bottom