BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

    2,961
    1,303
    293
    Feb 22, 2011
    Midlands, South Carolina
    Like you said, the key is balance. I try not to get too far away from what is in a bag. I do not assume to be a nutritionist, and every thing we do changes the balance.
     
  2. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

    2,359
    803
    301
    Dec 31, 2008
    North TX
    We haven't had much visible fat in our birds, it's been intra-abdominal fat that you would never know was there until you butchered them. Makes it harder to know how your feeding regimen is doing if you can't see the fat building up.
     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

    16,722
    599
    411
    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
    My husband just showed me Onegirlsrant.com and we are busting a gut.[​IMG] THe hazzards of raising chickens. . . .OMG, I suspect DH had a point behind showing me the video. As a gateway livestock, for us chickens lead to turkeys and ducks, and currently looking at dairy goats. ANd I have a note here to track down the organic milk source in town. lol Though I can honestly say, the horses and sheep were here LONG before the chickens. lol Maybe I do need an intervention. . .. nahhhhh . . . ..

    ( might be more than one video out there for onegirlsrant.com
     
  4. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

    450
    27
    139
    Apr 28, 2010
    Virginia

    I have used soaked dog food for almost 15 yrs now. It has high protein and its animal protein. It has high fat. Immediatly after pouring water over the amount I'm soaking you can see the fat (grease) start floating I do this twice a week which equals 4 feedings

    Ps. I was rooting for the buff cocker spaniel
     
  5. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

    2,359
    803
    301
    Dec 31, 2008
    North TX
    LOL. Right there with you. Already paid for my turkeys, just waiting for them to be hatched and sent to me. Have a line on the guineas that I want. Seriously researching dairy cows and honey bees. Loosely researching horses. Looking toward some ducks and geese farther into the future.
     
  6. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I've had some birds with quite a bit of fat...mostly older hens past their prime...and they were hugely fat on very little feed(fermented) but really good forage. My WR hens are birds that don't eat overly much at the feeder but their slow metabolism allows them to keep good condition and lots of fat despite that...that's one reason I love this breed. Don't take much feed to turn one of them into a huge and fat carcass, nor a lot to fuel their laying.

    Here's an old WR hen past laying that had been sharing a cup and a half of FF with 13 other adult birds each day for a couple of months and eating on some really good pasture and forage. I wouldn't want to see this level of fat on my layer hens but this ol' gal hadn't laid in a year, so she wasn't using up much nutrition. Fattest bird I've ever butchered.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is just half her carcass lying next to the whole carcass of an old BO/RIR cross rooster...big ol'guy.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Chillin' With My Peeps

    450
    27
    139
    Apr 28, 2010
    Virginia
    Reminds me of my grandfathers older rir and nh layer hens we would butcher as a kid
     
  8. bnjrob

    bnjrob Overrun With Chickens

    2,359
    803
    301
    Dec 31, 2008
    North TX
    Now that would be some good eating. I fattened up the cockerels we butchered recently but they didn't have nearly that much fat on them. I'd love to get that much fat to be able to render and use it.
     
  9. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

    2,961
    1,303
    293
    Feb 22, 2011
    Midlands, South Carolina
    Feel the keel. Feel them before you butcher them, and you will start seeing a correlation. It took me a bit to tell what was too much. It is easier to feel what is not enough.

    You are right. Processing them at the end of the season is revealing.

    A lot of how fat is laid on is genetic. Some are more prone to intra-abdominal fat. Guess it points back to knowing our birds. They are not all the same.
     
  10. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

    16,722
    599
    411
    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
    I followed the recommendation of my buckeyes-- minimum protein was to be 28%. He had tried raising them on a lesser amount and didnt like the results. So 28% or higher is his recommend.

    Protein that is not used for making muscle or other protein structures is also used for making hormones, and composite biochemicals the body needs. THe "extra' protein is used for energy, and if energy is in excess , is stored as fat.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by