BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Hey folks, I enjoy a good-natured discussion about ANYTHING...but just keep it respectful and within the bounds of the BYC's edicts....We're doing pretty well here and I don't want to give anyone a reason to shut us down or to be censured.

    You can discuss the financial standings of the State of West Virginia all you want (I personally keep 2 sets of books, among other things) [​IMG] but we might want to NIX the religious discussion. I really don't know what BYC's position on it's discussion is and I don't want to find out.

    Perhaps someone who doesn't have company will look into it for me??? I'm enjoying the company of my son who's lifestyle does not square up with hardly any dogma.[​IMG]

    Just something to consider 'til we understand the lay-of-the-land! lol

    RON

    The Word::::::: NO politics and NO religion....Thanks
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2015
    2 people like this.
  2. jbkirk

    jbkirk A Learning Breeder

    I should have noticed the "...." at the end of the verse.
    Now, moving on. is the blood specks thing hereditary?
     
  3. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes. It can be genetic. All lines will have some, and some more than others. Marans are famous for them. You can't candle interior quality in the darkest brown egg breeds. Though I doubt that is the reason now. No one candles their eggs for this. Just the commercial guys, and the reason white eggs have dominated the market for so long.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2015
  4. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    I certainly prefer southern winters, though we have been given a little taste a few times in the last few years.

    Concerning the north east, south east thing . . . I do not buy it all together. It still boils down to selection, no matter where they are. More than that, if chickens were not as adaptable as they are, they would not span the globe.

    I can see how some lines could become more resilient to some pressures over time.

    I wouldn't think that the chronic disease pressures are much more prevalent in the South. They are communicable diseases. What we have here, you have there. It depends on what they have been exposed to.
    Maybe concerning parasites and some bacteria. I can imagine a poultry yard in the southeast accumulating a load faster, just by the growing season lengths. Then we are humid to.

    It might be true that some diseases are more common in the south. I could see fowl pox being more of a problem in Louisiana vs. Arizona for an example.

    It seams that perceptions like this are built on limited experiences. I could picture someone drawing a conclusion based on buying some birds in poor condition from the south, and then getting some good stock from the North East. Some would have that experience, and maybe hear of someone having that experience, and then it becomes established "truth". It sounds good, but it is not based on strong evidence.

    If this was true, then the birds from the south would be more resistant to disease. I do not see that as the case. I would expect them to be as susceptible overall as similar flocks in New York.

    I think overall that there would be a similar amount of good stock both north and south. Simply put I would say the variation is more line to line than region to region. There is certainly some poorly kept fowl in the south. I bet that is true in other places also.

    Both cold winters and disease pressures are equally pressure. However, the biggest pressure of all is the man or woman with the axe. That is what makes them or breaks them, makes them good or bad, strong or weak.
     
    2 people like this.
  5. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    It would be a lot less work and money to dub their combs. That is what I would do if I was happy with the birds I had.

    Then if that is too problematic for you, Chanteclers were the Canadian solution to this problem. They have good combs for this already.
     
  6. ocap

    ocap Overrun With Chickens

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    I remember a discussion on another thread (might have been one of Blosl's) about buying and shipping east to west or west to east or south to north or north to south. I could see how one bad experience could travel word of mouth and become ingrained. Is there any evidence to back up where we should buy? I have a hard enough time just finding one good breeder willing to ship my preferred breed. This is one of the reasons I put the Ohio Nationals on my bucket list.

    changing the subject:
    I am becoming a dual purpose guy and acknowledging that I am not truly productive in meat or eggs but trying to achieve a productive balance. I also am beginning to see that my goal "should be" to improve my breed of choice and not keep looking for the best dual purpose breed.
     
  7. Shellz

    Shellz Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks Arielle. I'm just waiting to hear from the Buckeye breeder when eggs will be available. I imagine March/April. I'd get chicks, but I bought a great new incubator last year. [​IMG]
     
  8. dfr1973

    dfr1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to the Dark Side! [​IMG] [​IMG] So, which is your breed of choice?
     
  9. Shellz

    Shellz Chillin' With My Peeps

    I certainly could, but I just don't have the stomach for it. I would if I could. The other issue I have with Malines, is that they're rare & I feel outcrossing will add some much needed vigor. Sure, I could just raise straight Buckeyes or Chanteclers, but in my research I've found they don't get up to the size of Malines. I think if I play my cards right, this cross will eventually give me what I want. A no fuss, sustainable meat bird that will lay better in winter. [​IMG]
     
  10. ocap

    ocap Overrun With Chickens

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    buff brahma large fowl with all of their inefficiency I still like to look at them.
     

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