BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    I do not know what a roo is. It sounds like you are referring to cockerels. LOL.

    I am no seasoned breeder.

    I do not know what "pretty aggressive" is either. That could mean anything from vigorous to a man fighter. If the later, chop his head off. They are not worth messing with. Regardless of all of the amateur theories (I have heard a lot and smiled), and 'behavior modifications", the bird would have a few "screws loose", and the characteristic is highly heritable. Breeding one is producing more like him.

    Really, I do not see where it matters (unless the one is a man fighter). It sounds like an experimental cross to make layers of olive colored eggs. The requirement is a bird from a good dark egg laying strain x a good blue egg laying strain. There is no standard for type or color except your own. You cannot visually tell which would produce better layers that laid bigger or more eggs. To know that would be to prove them by their offspring.

    If you are considering trying to breed cuckoo Marans also (which is not clear), then good Marans type should be your goal. Cuckoo is not a difficult color, and could be worked on along the way.

    You are the one having to deal with them, and it sounds like you will enjoy the second bird the most.
     
  2. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been told by a more experienced and educated person in the know that color features only account for 1% or less of the transferred genetics. Some physical features like barring are more dominant than others. Focus on egg size and rate of lay if you are breeding for production from the hens and focus on stature and size from the rooster.
     
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  3. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    That is true, and a good post.

    What could be added is that for any that have a challenging color, and it matters to them, color should not be neglected along the way. Cuckoo is not one of those colors.
     
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  4. draye

    draye Overrun With Chickens

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    @ Hellbender:

    A report from my Green Egger Naked Project

    The one and only pullet from this cross that is laying is a pretty good layer.

    She is averaging an egg every other day. So by my definition she a good layer.
     
  5. bramblefir

    bramblefir Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Go with #2. Make your cake and frost it later.
     
  6. dfr1973

    dfr1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Certainly not a seasoned breeder by any stretch of the imagination, but if by "boxier and large" you mean he has more meat on his frame, I'd go with the meatier cockerel. By mature, do you mean trying to crow? Two weeks is not so huge a difference in cockerels if the size difference is as noticeable as you imply. While egg production is your goal, you will still inevitably hatch out cockerels and you will need to do something with them. By larger hens, do you mean broader? If so, would that be in front or back?

    George, "roo" is short for rooster, not kangaroo. [​IMG]
     
  7. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    I know. LOL. I have never gotten used to the new slang.

    I was trying to raise the bar a bit, by picking. Roo or rooster dos not tell the age etc. When I hear cockerel I know that it is an immature male under a year. When I hear cock or cock bird I know that it is a mature male over one year.
     
  8. dfr1973

    dfr1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have heard/read that rooster and cock are synonymous - both describe a male chicken over one year of age. I was under the impression that whichever you tend to use depends on region. As for the new slang ... I guess you have not come across "roolet" yet in place of cockerel? [​IMG]
     
  9. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    A young female/male horse is called?
    A young female/male pig is called?


    Using proper terms for filly, colt, mare, stallion, gelding is considered simply being up on horsemanship, not a snooty thing at all.
    Same with gilt, barrow, sow, boar, etc in hogs.

    When poultry moved from the farm and farm familiar surroundings to being re-embraced as a hobby by the long disconnected urban and suburbanites, the language and terms became "pet-like" in nature. Shrug.

    I have my personal preference on such things. To me, accuracy of terms is important. It surely is not to others.
     
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  10. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nothing better than a bunch of little "roolets" running around!
     
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