Bright green poop, help!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenchichi, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    This morning I noticed one of my Easter Egger acting sleepy and tired. I didn't think much of it then, since a few other birds were lying down for a nap. However, it's been a few hours and I just went back out to find her asleep again. It could just be coincidence, but I thought it best to separate her to examine her. I did the usual screening: she's walking, she's eating and drinking well, no mites or ticks and her crop and vent are also in good shape. I was just about to clear her to go back in the coop when she pooped a weird bright green color. Here's a picture[​IMG]

    Can anyone help? This is one of the sweetest birds in our flock and I do not want to lose her!
     
  2. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    Update: She has eaten some food mixed with mashed egg yolk and I gave her little bit of whole milk which she seems to enjoy. Her comb is starting to get its color back too. However she still doesn't have the same energy she usually does, and I'm still worried about the poop!
     
  3. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    [​IMG]
    This is where I have her for now. That's how she keeps laying, with her neck extended in front
     
  4. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    Update: now that she's had something to eat, her poop is starting to look like a bright green snake wrapped around normal droppings. Here's a picture:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NJ
    Looks to me like heat exhaustion. It is best to keep her indoors in a cool, dark spot where she can relax. Add some electrolytes to her water to help her get some of her energy back.
     
  6. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA

    Heat exhaustion sounds a whole lot better than E. coli or Marek's!! I live in Alabama and we've definitely been having a hot, humid Summer even by our own standards. Can exhaustion cause the green poop?
     
  7. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NJ
    Green poop is one of the main signs of heat exhaustion. That, coupled with the recent heat, and how she behaves all weak and all, makes me think heat exhaustion.
     
  8. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    Green poop can be an indicator for E. coli as well, but I'm with you on heat exhaustion. Her dropping are mostly normal colors now with little green bits. We did give the flock some of our excess herbs yesterday around 7, but I wasn't sure if they would stay in her digestive tract all the way until 12 today.

    Regardless, I've put an electrolyte solution in her hospital crate's water, as well as outside in the coop's water. Thanks for the tip!!
     
  9. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    NJ
    Hmmm, i always heard it was watery or bloody poop and ruffled feathers for E. coli. Never heard of the green poop part. That for me always screamed heat exhaustion. If you want to keep the rest of your flock cool, try putting a tray of water for them to stand in. Or put out some frozen fruit, like watermelon.
     
  10. chickenchichi

    chickenchichi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2016
    McDonough, GA
    Update: We let her stay inside last night and she was eating very well but still refused to drink water. I had to use a syringe to get her to drink and she was still unable to keep her head up, so we took her to our local vet who checked her over and pinpointed that it was definitely something upper respiratory. He told us to try tetracycline and also give it to the rest of the flock to be safe. We also went ahead and dewormed everyone just in case. We also bought some medicated chick starter and added it and some mealworms for protein to her regular feed. The results have been very surprising, she is now drinking again on her own (after one last syringe of medicated water) and is doing much better keeping her head up. She's still not her old self, but she's getting there! She's a fighter, I'm very hopeful that she will pull through.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016

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