Bring Broody and Chicks Inside?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by micstrachan, May 26, 2019.

  1. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    We’re having the coldest, wettest May on record in California. It’s currently 49°F and dropping. I have a broody and brand new baby chicks in a cage in the coop. They’ve done great all day, but wondering if I should bring them in tonight? Snuck the chicks in late last night and they’ve been fine. But Ms. Broody isn’t moving... only eating if I put raw egg directly in front of her. Not drinking water. Not pooping as far as I can tell. Chicks seem to be good. Thoughts?
     
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  2. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    @Wyorp Rock @azygous @casportpony @rebrascora. What do you think? This is my first time having a hen raise the chicks. My first two batches I hand raised inside with heat. Cashew seems to have adopted all four of the chicks.
     
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  3. casportpony

    casportpony Enlightened

    If it will give you peace of mind, bring them in. :D FWIW, I just started a fire in the fireplace 'cause it's cold here too!
     
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  4. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    I think they're good. Covered them with a towel to keep out drafts. I just fed Cashew some raw egg and watched the littles eat. Cashew came out for a second and clucked her way into her favorite spot in the corner on the floor, but I moved her back into the cage.
     
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  5. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    I’ll check on them a couple times after dark. If I hear upset peeping or see anyone out from under her, I’ll bring them in.
     
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  6. BigBlueHen53

    BigBlueHen53 Songster

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    WOW! Amazing that it is that cold on Memorial Day weekend in CA!!! Wishing you and your chickies all the best!
    :th
     
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  7. There's a four day dog show over Memorial Day weekend in southern CA. It is either bitterly cold or sizzling hot. This year it's the bitterly cold version. Hope tge vendors brought lots of coffee.
     
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  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    She's probably not moving so she can keep them warm. I would leave her be. The towel likely disturbed her that's why she came out, you may need to take that down.
     
  9. ChooksNQuilts

    ChooksNQuilts Free Ranging

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    I’m in southern Idaho. Unseasonably cold May this year. Very wet.
    I’ve had three first time broodys hatch and rear chicks starting in early April.
    The latest batch are 3 weeks.
    Everyone is doing well.
    The broodys keep the babies warm.
    We put a dog yard around the broody coop and put plywood with a tarp over the top to keep part of their yard dry.

    My latest broody, Mitzi, had her 4 babies negotiating an 18” high ramp at 5 days old.
    This is her first time raising chicks.
    Broody raised chicks are very capable and those mommas take better care of them than we can.
    They’re amazing and so fun to watch.
    Today they were out free ranging and the clouds rolled in fast with downpours, thunder and lightning...all the chickens were running for cover.
    I looked for Mitzi and the babies and there they were...in the bantam coop run, dry and safe with momma. :yesss:
     
  10. azygous

    azygous Crossing the Road

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    Your broody knows what she's doing. She won't let the babies get cold. It's a hundred degrees under her so you don't need to worry.

    Eight weeks ago I got new chicks, and I used the heating pad cave system in the run. It was in the low 30s at night and barely fifty during the day, and they did fine. They ran around and when they got chilled they ducked under their heating pad.

    As long as baby chicks have a heat source, they can handle some very cold temps just fine.
     

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