*Buff Orpington Thread!*

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by andrew6d9, Apr 30, 2011.

  1. tatsmom25

    tatsmom25 Out Of The Brooder

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    Our broody silky pullet just hatched 4 chicks, 3 BO and a white leghorn. I didn't think they would actually hatch but decided to let her try. I just can't resist fuzzy little chicks. Now we have 26 chickens!
     
  2. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    congrats! I want to do a winter hatch after the girls are settled in their new coop.
     
  3. bhj123

    bhj123 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How exciting!!!!
    I can't resist them either. ;)
     
  4. Ladybug2001

    Ladybug2001 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm going to agree that I would not kill my dog if either of them got ahold of one of my chickens. Although! They both know better, even though they are both breeds that have a natural instinct for things like that. One is a Schnauzer, they are known for pulling mice and rats out of holes and he, even in his age, will catch said mice and rats. The other is a English Springer Spaniel, a bird dog, ironically she doesn't do much bird catching. I don't think she knows she is a bird dog, more like a lap dog.

    With all that said, I WILL kill a dog that isn't my own that is after my chickens.
     
    2 people like this.
  5. RoosterLew

    RoosterLew Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Coffeyville, Ks
    Just to balance out the I Woulds....
    Put my dear friend "Duke" down a week ago. He killed 5 birds.
    Re-homing him was not an option, he was an aggressive breed. Tried for 2 years to find him a home. He could scale 6' plus fences, eat through them if he could not climb them, he has chewed through cables, pulled chains apart, etc.

    You are right, it was my fault. I did not have the time to train him or care for him correctly. I did not keep my chickens safe. I should have shot him 2 years ago.

    It was a hard thing to do, but it had to be done.
     
  6. RoosterLew

    RoosterLew Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Coffeyville, Ks
    Now to help get back on track. How big should a BO be? I know everyone list weights, but what size? Does anyone have a picture that would show what "big" and "small" are??
    I have some smaller girls that are beautiful, and not as nice bigger girls. Which would be better, to breed size with the good type smaller girls with a big boy? Or to use the bigger girls and try to improve type ?

    Is there a point when small is too small to breed regardless of type?

    They say build the barn first.... But can you start from a shed ? Lol.
    Btw, before it even goes there, none of them are hatchery stock.
     
  7. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not exactly sure, but awhile back people were posting pictures of their orps in their laps and they can be pretty big. My girl was not from "intentional breeding" and she's a peanut in comparison to most.
     
  8. bhj123

    bhj123 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can I show hatchery stock? I have been seeing "exhibition" and "hatchery" stock and quite frankly the hatchery stock looks way prettier. They're not as fat as the show bred birds and are better layers.
     
  9. Irishhenman

    Irishhenman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No you couldn't, hatchery birds are not bred to the standards and while hatchery birds are called buff orpingtons they actually show very little in common especially if compared to an English standard Orpington which are a lot fluffier and usually bigger than SOP birds. Hatchery birds are a lot thinner and have less flesh and their feathers are not as full. in my opinion the best looking Orp is the English one followed by the SOP and then the hatchery bird if it should even be called an Orpington but that is just my opinion. Hatchery birds are bred on a large scale for production values not to keep them to the standards.
     
  10. thedragonlady

    thedragonlady Overrun With Chickens

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    Do you have an APA Standard of Perfection ? It is all spelled out in there. If you are going to breed Orps, you need one. Christmas is coming......
     
    1 person likes this.

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