Brandonbruhhh

Hatching
Aug 17, 2019
3
5
8
I’m new to keeping birds and I don’t know much besides what I googled online. I want to get a Red Golden Pheasant, but I’m not sure on how to go with it. My questions I have are how loud are they, what do they eat exactly, could I have just one bird or could I get two males in one cage, how big should there cage be, what are some natural predators they have ( I live in Indiana), what should be in there cage a pond? Or branches, what exactly, are they good to be handled gently or are they aggressive, how long do they live for in human care, do they make good pets. Any other advice or tips would be greatly appreciated
 

007Sean

Face it, Embrace it, Ace it, Replace it
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Oct 25, 2015
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South Central Texas
Golden pheasants are easily kept. They aren't loud, even during breeding season. A good complete and balanced feed of at least 24% protein, should be fed, they also enjoy the occasional treat... BOSS, scratch in winter, unsalted peanuts and greens.

You can raise one male or have several in one pen if it is a large pen, ie; 20' x 30' they do better in trios or more, like 1 male to 4 or 6 females.

Everything will try to get to you're birds, so build a predator proof enclosure. In your area, hawks, owls, raccoons, coyotes, feral dogs and cats are the most likely predators.
A planted and landscaped aviary is best for the birds, fountain grasses, big smooth rocks, small shrubs, stumps, limbs are all good 'pheasant furniture'.

They can be tamed down considerably, if handled very frequently when chicks and juveniles. Although the may eat from your hand they are still 'wild' and will not 'free range', if one gets out or escapes, it will most likely not return and a predator will have it in a quick chilly minute.

Some can be fairly aggressive but most are not, at least not towards humans...they can be overbearing on hens though, that's why it's best to have 4 or 5 hens for every male and plenty of 'escape' places for the hens to get away from a overly aggressive male.
With alot of time, handling, and patience they can be tamed to make fair pets but never really become what I would call a 'pet'.
I have birds that are 13 years old...its not uncommon for Goldens to live 25 years in captivity.
 

Brandonbruhhh

Hatching
Aug 17, 2019
3
5
8
Golden pheasants are easily kept. They aren't loud, even during breeding season. A good complete and balanced feed of at least 24% protein, should be fed, they also enjoy the occasional treat... BOSS, scratch in winter, unsalted peanuts and greens.

You can raise one male or have several in one pen if it is a large pen, ie; 20' x 30' they do better in trios or more, like 1 male to 4 or 6 females.

Everything will try to get to you're birds, so build a predator proof enclosure. In your area, hawks, owls, raccoons, coyotes, feral dogs and cats are the most likely predators.
A planted and landscaped aviary is best for the birds, fountain grasses, big smooth rocks, small shrubs, stumps, limbs are all good 'pheasant furniture'.

They can be tamed down considerably, if handled very frequently when chicks and juveniles. Although the may eat from your hand they are still 'wild' and will not 'free range', if one gets out or escapes, it will most likely not return and a predator will have it in a quick chilly minute.

Some can be fairly aggressive but most are not, at least not towards humans...they can be overbearing on hens though, that's why it's best to have 4 or 5 hens for every male and plenty of 'escape' places for the hens to get away from a overly aggressive male.
With alot of time, handling, and patience they can be tamed to make fair pets but never really become what I would call a 'pet'.
I have birds that are 13 years old...its not uncommon for Goldens to live 25 years in captivity.
Thank you for answering. You are very helpful. I do not think I will be getting many. Most likely one possibly two. I want to try to build them aviary from scratch. The area where I want to build is 14ish feet but 9ish feet and was thinking to make it 7 feet tall would that be good for one bird or two? I get what you mean by they aren’t really ‘Pets’ but I find they fascinating and just a cool bird and think it would be fun to raise one
 

007Sean

Face it, Embrace it, Ace it, Replace it
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Oct 25, 2015
33,697
202,043
1,652
South Central Texas
From what I read it said they do better in pairs, and they like to climb and perch high up, they do pretty well in all weather but still have somewhere they can hide in, they like branches and logs
You are correct, they tend to like perches that are at the highest point in the aviary.
Actually they will do better with a 1:5 ratio, 1 cockbird to 4 or 5 hens.
Eventhough they can handle all kinds of weather, it's a good practice to have sheltered areas away from the elements, and dry. No drafts in the perching/roosting areas.
 

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