LittleRedRanch

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
37
84
54
Northwest Florida
I've got 2 broiler chicks 2 months old (and the size of full grown chickens lol) i want to keep them happy and healthy for their life.
I keep them seperate from everyone in their own coop for 2 so they can eat a small amount only at night they free range during the day. The bugs are not as plenty now that the cold weather has come so they move around and scavenge more. They can still fly up on everything about 3-4feet (which i read usually they are too heavy to fly) they can still run pretty fast. (My millie Fleur doesn't like anyone within 6 to 100 feet of her lol)

If I can keep them healthy and active do they have a good chance of living longer?
They are hens so how many eggs can I expect a year from them?
If they happened to breed to my RIR or BO rooster would their chicks live longer or still have their eating tendencies?
 

LittleRedRanch

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
37
84
54
Northwest Florida
Broiler-fryer hens can lead a normal like for broiler-fryer hens.
I am unable to answer your question until you tell us what you consider a normal life for a broiler-fryer hen.

Do plow horses lead the same type of life that carrage horses do?

Obviously you didn't read the paragraph I wrote with 3 questions at the end. And to answer your question about horses, it depends on the owner.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,195
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
I've got 2 broiler chicks... I keep them seperate from everyone in their own coop for 2 so they can eat a small amount only at night they free range during the day.... can keep them healthy and active do they have a good chance of living longer? They are hens so how many eggs can I expect a year from them?...


I doubt that limiting their groceries will have much of an effect on their expected life span. Because broiler chicks are first generation crosses between two or more very inbred strains of meat type chickens, little or no thought went into the DNA or genes that make up laying hens. So without knowing the DNA profile of your two broiler hens their egg production is mostly unknown but on limited feed like you seem to be talking about I am not optimistic at all about their egg production potential.
 

townchicks

Free Ranging
Dec 1, 2016
1,998
6,504
666
Contra Costa county, Ca.
I don't have any actual experience with broilers, but from what I've read, they can have a happy but shorter life. Keeping their weight within limits and keeping them active can help for a while. Because of the way they are built, they will have leg problems as they age and sooner or later most become crippled. Be prepared to make the decision to euthanize then. They are also prone to heart attacks, so be prepared for a sudden death. Who knows if they will live long enough to lay eggs, but frankly, if they do, I would not allow the roosters to breed them. The weigh of a roo on their back could put undue stress on their legs, and if he's rough with them or chases them, could bring on a heart attack. I think you should continue keeping them separate from the others.
Just let them be chickens for what ever life they get to enjoy. You might consider making notes too, as you go along, others have asked these questions, and others will in the future. You may be able to answer some of their questions.
 

LittleRedRanch

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
37
84
54
Northwest Florida
I don't have any actual experience with broilers, but from what I've read, they can have a happy but shorter life. Keeping their weight within limits and keeping them active can help for a while. Because of the way they are built, they will have leg problems as they age and sooner or later most become crippled. Be prepared to make the decision to euthanize then. They are also prone to heart attacks, so be prepared for a sudden death. Who knows if they will live long enough to lay eggs, but frankly, if they do, I would not allow the roosters to breed them. The weigh of a roo on their back could put undue stress on their legs, and if he's rough with them or chases them, could bring on a heart attack. I think you should continue keeping them separate from the others.
Just let them be chickens for what ever life they get to enjoy. You might consider making notes too, as you go along, others have asked these questions, and others will in the future. You may be able to answer some of their questions.


I didn't plan on getting them they were just the last little yellows left at our tractor supply along with 3 little black chicks and the manager was like you want them all I don't know what breeds they are. And that's how it happened lol. I'm not going to butcher them. I don't care if they lay eggs. I just want them to live out their years no matter how long or short. Thank you for the information! I'll keep them separate from the roosters.
 

puffypoo

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Oct 3, 2015
3,148
19,298
917
Massachusetts
I hate it when people unknowingly get CX hoping for pets, and are disappointed at their quick weight gain and gradual decline. It's sad, really. Not just for the bird but for the unsuspecting owner as well. :(
I would just limit their diets and possibly feed a lower protein percent than what is usually fed to broilers.
Remember, if they appear to be suffering, it's never a good idea to let them live if they don't have a chance of recovery.
Good luck :hugs
 

Morrigan

Free Ranging
7 Years
Apr 9, 2014
3,044
12,134
692
N. California
This topic has come up a few times, so you might want to try some searches on this forum.

I've never raised a meat chicken past 3 months, but I've read of others who have. Several have made it to the one year mark, and the hens have laid eggs. Limiting their diet and keeping them active seems to be the key to those who live relatively longer lives.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,195
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
I didn't plan on getting them they were just the last little yellows left at our tractor supply along with 3 little black chicks and the manager was like you want them all I don't know what breeds they are. And that's how it happened lol. I'm not going to butcher them. I don't care if they lay eggs. I just want them to live out their years no matter how long or short. Thank you for the information! I'll keep them separate from the roosters.

Keeping them separate is likely unnecessary because it is highly unlikely that most meat roosters will be physically able to tread a hen.
 

MANNA-PRO

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