Can i keep multiple bantam roosters together

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Legendchicken, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. Legendchicken

    Legendchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have ordered 10 straight run bantams of various breeds. I was wondering if it would be a problem with multiple roosters scince straight run was the only available sex selection i ordered mainly docial breeds suck as plymouth rocks brahmas and cochins not sure if this would affct that at all my hopes would be to keep them all together svince i have seen multiple roosters together in the past. Also does anyone have any pics of a bantam next to a standard just wanted to see
     
  2. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    Do you have any current birds? How many males and females?

    If you don't have any, whether or not you can keep all 10 together will depend on what ratio of cockerels to pullets you actually get. Most likely you will have to make a bachelor pad for the extra males, or get rid of some.
     
  3. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC!
    Unfortunately, bantams are not sold sexed as chicks due to their size making the vent sexing process used on large fowl birds a non-option. For clarity - the breeds you listed are the breeds in which you have ordered bantam birds, correct? Or have you ordered bantams and the breeds you listed in large fowl? Only asking as the last bit asking for comparative photos of bantam and large fowl together has me unsure.

    There really is no way to answer your question at this point - the reason being that there are situations in which multiple roosters are able to exist happily together, and situations where it turns out very badly and only time will tell which your situation will prove to be. Some information that will play into the potential for success or failure will be:
    How much space will the birds be in? Will they be in a confined coop/run situation or in a free range situation? Are these 10 birds going to be the only birds you keep or will you be adding more birds to increase the ratio of males to females once you establish how many of the birds you get are male/female? Are you open to the idea of a mail flock and a bachelor pad grouping - which would require entirely separate quarters, etc for the bachelor group? Are you open to the idea of maintaining breeding groups vs. wanting one large flock - this would require multiple housing units?
     
  4. TinyBirds

    TinyBirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In the past i kept bantam hens with just a couple roosters in a covered run to protect from hawks, and the extra roosters can be fun to let them free range as a bachelor group if you have a big property and have a separate night coop for them. If they can still see the other birds though they may fight through the fence. With just the small amount you ordered i would just leave them all together and just remove any that cause trouble later (you could get lucky with no troublemakers). The bantams are nice since the hens backs dont get bald as fast as with bigger birds in a rooster heavy pen. Chicken aprons will also help protect the hens backs.
     
  5. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It might depend on the breed and ratio. Growing up we had bantams, both sexes and large fowl both sexes living together.
    At one point recently I had three bantam roosters along with large fowl roosters with the flock with no problem. I did give one bantam rooster to someone who was looking for one and then just recently one got picked off by a hawk but I still have one bantam with two large fowl roosters and we've never had a problem.
    BTW they've all had big attitudes in little bodies, were extremely protective of their hens and very people friendly, making good pets and allowing children to pick them up and carry them.
     

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