Castrating a Rooster Anyone?

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by SnowShoez, Oct 20, 2012.

  1. SnowShoez

    SnowShoez Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok does anyone know of an ole'timer farmer that might have castrated roosters to show me how its done? I know how to do it yet do not want to make an attempt without proper training to ensure the best outcome of the roos. Poor guys. :(

    Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated thanks all. :)
     
  2. ImpulsiveFarmer

    ImpulsiveFarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Contact your local farm bureau or ag extension, they can probably point you in the right direction. That or call a vet, if they don't do it I'm sure they know of someone who does.
     
  3. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why would you want to do that? Poor guy my roo would probably try & kill me if I did that to him. I'm just sitting here thinking why.
     
  4. catdaddyfro

    catdaddyfro Overrun With Chickens

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    Caponizing-google it [​IMG]
     
  5. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't raise meat birds & have never heard of this. It makes them fatter it says. Uh, guess it would he wouldn't be chasing the girls around LOL!!
     
  6. SnowShoez

    SnowShoez Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 21, 2012
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    We raise pets and those clients that have Roos that can not be kept in backyards must be culled. Some roos where trying to pass as hens until they started crowing and some little boy still wanted to keep Mr. Freckles. I would like to try to save some that are loved as pets instead of culling them. Not guaranteed but there is a high percentage that begin to act like a quiet hen.. , maybe they could stick around if they didn't wake up the neighbors, become aggressive, damage the existing pet hens. They also could provide a beautiful and handsome ornamental bird that comes when you say "Mr. Freckles I have Toast!"

    Just a thought huh? [​IMG]

    I just thought one of you Ole' chicken people (like me) might happen to know of someone.

    thanks for your answers all! Enjoy the Fall
     
  7. DaikaijuTorira

    DaikaijuTorira Out Of The Brooder

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    I don't know anything personally about caponizing, just what I've read in a couple of threads in the meat birds section of the forum: here and here Warning: Both have graphic pictures, so if you're squeamish... might want to pass. I had the same thoughts about the possibility of capons as pets where roosters aren't allowed, my understanding is that it should be done when they are young for the best chance of survival and for the desired development. It's probably too late for Mr. Freckles, but I don't know for certain. After reading/seeing I came to the conclusion that I wouldn't be able to do it. Just a few other thoughts for Mr. Freckles, aggressiveness can be managed. Depending on the bird, some are naturally less aggressive than others. The more hand taming done as they grow, the less likely they will be to cause a problem (at least to the humans they know, can't say they won't try to protect their human flock from strangers.) It's similar to raising iguanas or monitor lizards, they will be downright nasty if they aren't held and given lots of attention as they grow, worse, in my opinion, than roosters. There isn't much that can be done for the crowing, but if he can be kept enclosed at night and let out after a reasonable time it shouldn't be waking neighbors, unless there are neighbors really close by that work at night. If fully enclosed isn't an option, plants and lots of them, and anything else that can be used to absorb or block sound. Anyway, good luck, and I hope you can find a solution for your clients that want to keep their beloved pets. :)
     
  8. SnowShoez

    SnowShoez Out Of The Brooder

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    I like the idea of maybe keeping him in at night and in the morning but as you know they crow all day long! Yet I will suggest it to them and thank you so much for taking the time. :)
     
  9. RHRanch

    RHRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    I believe that caponized roosters still crow, so whats the point?
     
  10. SnowShoez

    SnowShoez Out Of The Brooder

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    Your information is not entirely correct. According to a plethora of research you might reconsider.?



    In caponisation, the surgical castration of male chickens, the testes of the male chicken are completely removed. As a result, the cockerel fails to develop secondary male characteristics or tends to lose them if they were already developed. Capons are usually quiet and docile, lacking a cockerel’s disposition to fight. Caponised cockerels lack the characteristics associated with sexually mature rooster (MAST et al., 1981). The comb and wattles cease their growth after castration, so the head of a capon appears to be small. The hackle, tail and saddle feathers grow, however, unusually long (ANONYMUS, 1948). Testes removal eliminates production of male sex hormones and thusly reduces the male sex instinct and changes their behaviour (ANDREW, 1972; ANDREW and JONES, 1992).




    Thanks anyway [​IMG]



     

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