Chick noise, when does it stop?

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
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I'd give it a go then, and just see how it goes and how the flock reacts to her. Obviously if they all throw a fit you might need to extend this out longer, but 6 weeks alongside the others really should be plenty.

If it's safe predator-wise I'd leave the pop door open - if not, and you don't have an auto door, try to get out early to open the door, in case she needs to get out.
 

CKfarm22

Songster
Jul 8, 2021
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Central NJ
I'd give it a go then, and just see how it goes and how the flock reacts to her. Obviously if they all throw a fit you might need to extend this out longer, but 6 weeks alongside the others really should be plenty.

If it's safe predator-wise I'd leave the pop door open - if not, and you don't have an auto door, try to get out early to open the door, in case she needs to get out.
i will try this this weekend! Thank you!
 

3KillerBs

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
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In imitation of one of the long-term experts here, I created a juvenile roost for my younger and lower-status birds.

It's very simple, just concrete blocks and scrap wood.

0917212028a.jpg
 

3KillerBs

Enabler
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I’m thinking she will be one of the lower status birds right now because she’s “new”, so i will definitely try a concrete block

I find blocks, bricks, pavers, and chunks of wood cut-offs invaluable in my coop. They give me all sorts of flexibility for rearranging things and setting them up in either a temporary or permanent fashion.
 

Sydney65

Crowing
Aug 2, 2019
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Difference in individual bird personalities and species make every experience different, I think. Agree with juvenile roost. I have guineas, so that may be the species difference- I put my juvy roosts higher and closer to the wall-plenty of room for a keet, but grown goons have no interest.
The 1st time I integrated, I cut a doorway big enough for the keets into the brooder and moved the whole thing into the coop, tucked under the drop boards. The keets stayed in it for a cpl of days and then started venturing out, knowing they could duck back to safety of brooder.(large tote). So now I have an outdoor brooder and made an new indoor one.
The last two batches of incubated keets, my hen was broody so not part of the equation. And again, this may be diff in species that won't work for chickens.🤷‍♀️
The guineas always come to patio door to see what's going on in their old house. I moved the brooder infront of the door every a.m. -another diff, bc it was summer.
The little ones could look out to the big new world, and the adults would come peak at the "nursery".
As the days went by, my boys were spending more and more time watching the keets through the window, and when they were big enough, I started taking them outside for short excursions in an enclosed mesh basket.
Long story short, the first time I took them out w/o the basket, they went from my arm straight to the males,& after that, I no longer existed. The males lined them up, protected them,disciplined them, and in the coop they went.
When the hen moved back in w/her brood, she wasn't as welcoming. But they had those roosts and as long as they stayed away from her and her keets, they were fine. Not that they always did, bc everyone wants a mama-but it worked out.
 

Sally PB

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Aug 7, 2020
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I find blocks, bricks, pavers, and chunks of wood cut-offs invaluable in my coop. They give me all sorts of flexibility for rearranging things and setting them up in either a temporary or permanent fashion.
Almost nothing trash, it's all treasure!

Brooder in the coop? Repurposed wood scraps and fencing. The new screws were saved when I took it down. Pullets roost? Those screws and different wood scraps.
 

bruceha2000

Addict
9 Years
Apr 19, 2012
17,525
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Lucky! I was scared to put small chicks in because this is my first time doing this.. so i’m not really sure what i’m doing
Listen to @rosemarythyme ;)

I find earlier is better since, as rosemary said, they aren't seen as a threat other than when food is involved. I toss the food all around so the birds don't have to fight for access to food in a small space. The littles figure out pretty quick that they need to dodge the older hens.

Put her on the roost after dark, chickens don't see well at night and if they are already asleep they won't particularly notice a new body anyway.

My current juveniles (20 weeks) were raised by a hen so until she blew them off they were on a specific place on the 4' roosts at night starting at about 3 weeks, protected by her. Now one of them will roost with the older hens on the opposite side of the coop. The other 5 seem to think they REALLY need to roost where Nuit had them originally but other birds are getting there before the younger birds so they get up either on the alpaca stand in the barn alley or the top of the people door to the coop and I have to carry them in every night. Some stand up and get on my hand either resigned to their move or they enjoy the ride ;) There is usually a long open area on one roost so I put them there. One day these girls will hit the roost on their own, not sure when.

They have about 5 feet of roost space too
How many birds? You need 1' of roost space per bird minimum. If you are integrating I think you need quite a bit more so the young ones can stay a distance from the older birds.
 

CKfarm22

Songster
Jul 8, 2021
845
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Central NJ
Listen to @rosemarythyme ;)

I find earlier is better since, as rosemary said, they aren't seen as a threat other than when food is involved. I toss the food all around so the birds don't have to fight for access to food in a small space. The littles figure out pretty quick that they need to dodge the older hens.

Put her on the roost after dark, chickens don't see well at night and if they are already asleep they won't particularly notice a new body anyway.

My current juveniles (20 weeks) were raised by a hen so until she blew them off they were on a specific place on the 4' roosts at night starting at about 3 weeks, protected by her. Now one of them will roost with the older hens on the opposite side of the coop. The other 5 seem to think they REALLY need to roost where Nuit had them originally but other birds are getting there before the younger birds so they get up either on the alpaca stand in the barn alley or the top of the people door to the coop and I have to carry them in every night. Some stand up and get on my hand either resigned to their move or they enjoy the ride ;) There is usually a long open area on one roost so I put them there. One day these girls will hit the roost on their own, not sure when.


How many birds? You need 1' of roost space per bird minimum. If you are integrating I think you need quite a bit more so the young ones can stay a distance from the older birds.
I only have 3 hens and the BO. So more than enough space :)
 

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