Chicken with odd scab on foot starting to smell rotten...

Fluffy_Feathers

Songster
Jul 6, 2017
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Missouri
You may need to limit her activity for part of the day and see if that helps with the healing process.
Not sure where she places that stub when walking - would you say it's directly on the scab or ?
No, she doesn't walk directly on the scab. She may put some weight on the back most part, and when she walks forward she probably puts some pressure on the scab. But the entire scab isn't hitting the ground when she walks and isn't under her foot. I hope that's a clear explanation.
 

Vickischics

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 6, 2020
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Space Coast of Florida
I was reading your posts and replies from the various people. As a RN that loves wounds (I know, that's gross) I can relate the pictures that I am viewing to the chronic wounds I have seen in humans.
When a severe injury to a distal extremity happens such as frost bite, the degree to which the tissue was damage often leads to reoccurring problems. Just like the one you are having with a small black area on the limb that progressively become larger.

The recommendation of soaking in Epsom Salts was an excellent choice. The infusion of sodium to the necrotic eschar black tissue will naturally assist with the debridement of the hard Eschar tissue until it falls off or you remove it. Underneath will show a yellowish/greenish, sticky pus like base.
The Eschar is black and leathery looking such as in your pictures with the edges pulling away. The pulling away edges is the tissue underneath trying to rid the black Eschar scab.

That necrotic tissue is formed when healthy tissue dies and becomes dehydrated. This is a typical result of local ischemia from unrelieved localized pressure that will compress the soft tissue between a surface and the underlying bone or bony prominence. This will lead to an ulcer.
The underlying ulcer may be to a depth you do not know unless measured none the less, if there is any blood after the removal of the black Eschar scab, it WILL heal.
It does take time because it has to heal from the base of the wound upward. (from the deep inside to the outside)

Treatment for human ulcers is to keep the wound base moist, (Not the surrounding tissue) prevent tissue dehydration thus preventing the necrotic tissue cycle. The recommended dressing for this wound on a human is a Hydro gel dressing. It is made up of a starch polymer and 96% water and/or Honey impregnated dressings that contain a medical grade honey that has evidence to encourage healing, moisture and has shown antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory properties.

Keeping the area clean and dry with the addition of keeping the wound base moist will create a favorable tissue granulation environment. If you can find a way to secure and keep an occlusive bandage on her foot that would be a good start. IDK if they sale chicken booties like the ones they have for dogs feet. But, this would be ideal for the ulcer to heal.

The rest of the foot and leg appear to be healthy and pink in color. Gently messaging her leg always from the most distal end toward her heart is best. You can use coconut oil on her foot stump and up her leg.
She would most likely get use to you messaging her legs and really like it.

This is my 2 cents from a Nurse that loves Wounds and Ostomys.

Good Luck, I think your on the right road but, just needed a little extra human wound expertise to get her healed up. Please keep us posted.
 

humblehillsfarm

Songster
Mar 27, 2020
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Southwestern Pennsylvania
I was thinking the same thing, it seemed the scab was getting bigger. Ugh...

Should I wait to see how it turns out, until we can say for certain? I'm wary of waiting to see how things turn out, since that's what got it so severe originally.

I really, REALLY hope it's not coming back... maybe other people will chime in with their thoughts
My vet said surgery often results in the Bumblefoot returning. Of course that was the opinion of one vet, but in my experience it has proven to be true. I tried antibiotics alone on a hen and it didn’t work so I went to a different vet to have it surgically removed and it came back. As it was coming back it looked much like your chicken’s stump. Beyond that experience I am not sure what else to recommend. You can try buying Tricide Neo which is a fish antibiotic used externally and use that to soak the foot instead of Epsom salts. But I’d recommend trying to get ahold of some oral antibiotics as well. I think attacking this aggressively is the best option.
 

Fluffy_Feathers

Songster
Jul 6, 2017
174
178
126
Missouri
I was reading your posts and replies from the various people. As a RN that loves wounds (I know, that's gross) I can relate the pictures that I am viewing to the chronic wounds I have seen in humans.
When a severe injury to a distal extremity happens such as frost bite, the degree to which the tissue was damage often leads to reoccurring problems. Just like the one you are having with a small black area on the limb that progressively become larger.

The recommendation of soaking in Epsom Salts was an excellent choice. The infusion of sodium to the necrotic eschar black tissue will naturally assist with the debridement of the hard Eschar tissue until it falls off or you remove it. Underneath will show a yellowish/greenish, sticky pus like base.
The Eschar is black and leathery looking such as in your pictures with the edges pulling away. The pulling away edges is the tissue underneath trying to rid the black Eschar scab.

That necrotic tissue is formed when healthy tissue dies and becomes dehydrated. This is a typical result of local ischemia from unrelieved localized pressure that will compress the soft tissue between a surface and the underlying bone or bony prominence. This will lead to an ulcer.
The underlying ulcer may be to a depth you do not know unless measured none the less, if there is any blood after the removal of the black Eschar scab, it WILL heal.
It does take time because it has to heal from the base of the wound upward. (from the deep inside to the outside)

Treatment for human ulcers is to keep the wound base moist, (Not the surrounding tissue) prevent tissue dehydration thus preventing the necrotic tissue cycle. The recommended dressing for this wound on a human is a Hydro gel dressing. It is made up of a starch polymer and 96% water and/or Honey impregnated dressings that contain a medical grade honey that has evidence to encourage healing, moisture and has shown antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory properties.

Keeping the area clean and dry with the addition of keeping the wound base moist will create a favorable tissue granulation environment. If you can find a way to secure and keep an occlusive bandage on her foot that would be a good start. IDK if they sale chicken booties like the ones they have for dogs feet. But, this would be ideal for the ulcer to heal.

The rest of the foot and leg appear to be healthy and pink in color. Gently messaging her leg always from the most distal end toward her heart is best. You can use coconut oil on her foot stump and up her leg.
She would most likely get use to you messaging her legs and really like it.

This is my 2 cents from a Nurse that loves Wounds and Ostomys.

Good Luck, I think your on the right road but, just needed a little extra human wound expertise to get her healed up. Please keep us posted.
Thank you for your detailed explanation and expertise! I dont have any occlusive hydrogel bandages right now. Would using Vaseline work for now? I will probably get the hydrogel bandages tomorrow.

Also, should I remove the new scab that has formed and start over, using the hydrogel bandages? Or just leave the scab on?

Also, for keeping the bandage on; would it be okay to wrap it up like I have been doing to keep it in place? I notice you emphasize on keep just the base of the wound moist and nothing else, would wrapping it make the rest of the foot moist?
 

Vickischics

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 6, 2020
908
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Space Coast of Florida
Thank you for your detailed explanation and expertise! I dont have any occlusive hydrogel bandages right now. Would using Vaseline work for now? I will probably get the hydrogel bandages tomorrow.

Also, should I remove the new scab that has formed and start over, using the hydrogel bandages? Or just leave the scab on?

Also, for keeping the bandage on; would it be okay to wrap it up like I have been doing to keep it in place? I notice you emphasize on keep just the base of the wound moist and nothing else, would wrapping it make the rest of the foot moist?
That would be great. Remove the eschar by soaking it and removing it.
You can apply triple antibiotic woth a Q tip into the wound. The trick is not allowing the surrounding tissue to become too moist to prevent good tissue breakdown. I would cover it with a gauze dressing. Wrap and secure saran wrap and tape it in place. You can also use a self adhering kling ace wrap.
Keep moisture in and dirt out.
Im working tonight, so, I check bk on you throughout the night.
 

Vickischics

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 6, 2020
908
1,954
143
Space Coast of Florida
That would be great. Remove the eschar by soaking it and removing it.
You can apply triple antibiotic woth a Q tip into the wound. The trick is not allowing the surrounding tissue to become too moist to prevent good tissue breakdown. I would cover it with a gauze dressing. Wrap and secure saran wrap and tape it in place. You can also use a self adhering kling ace wrap.
Keep moisture in and dirt out.
Im working tonight, so, I check bk on you throughout the night.
The odor can be reduced/gone by making a Dakins solution.
The recipe is on line.
Only use this x1 daily. It will help get rid of that rotten smell thats so gross.
 

Fluffy_Feathers

Songster
Jul 6, 2017
174
178
126
Missouri
That would be great. Remove the eschar by soaking it and removing it.
You can apply triple antibiotic woth a Q tip into the wound. The trick is not allowing the surrounding tissue to become too moist to prevent good tissue breakdown. I would cover it with a gauze dressing. Wrap and secure saran wrap and tape it in place. You can also use a self adhering kling ace wrap.
Keep moisture in and dirt out.
Im working tonight, so, I check bk on you throughout the night.
Are you saying to cover the hydrogel bandage with the gauze dressing and then saran wrap?
The odor can be reduced/gone by making a Dakins solution.
The recipe is on line.
Only use this x1 daily. It will help get rid of that rotten smell thats so gross.
The rotten smell is gone. It left with the first scab that was removed. I'll keep that in mind though.
 

Vickischics

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 6, 2020
908
1,954
143
Space Coast of Florida
Are you saying to cover the hydrogel bandage with the gauze dressing and then saran wrap?

The rotten smell is gone. It left with the first scab that was removed. I'll keep that in mind though.
You got it!! She needs a little chicken prosthetic boot.
Poor baby.
Your doing such a great job with her.
 

Fluffy_Feathers

Songster
Jul 6, 2017
174
178
126
Missouri
You got it!! She needs a little chicken prosthetic boot.
Poor baby.
Your doing such a great job with her.
Thank you, I've been really trying my best, with my little knowledge about wounds and limited supplies. I hate that I have to remove this new scab too. I thought that after the initial scab the worst would be over. Hopefully this one will be easier to remove since it's new.
 

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