Chickens for the Texas Heat

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by robisonfamily7, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. TexasAggieOfc

    TexasAggieOfc Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 4, 2010
    Lincoln, NE
    Welcome to the world of chickens!

    As far as the heat, it got awfully hot up here in Northeast Texas this summer (110+!) and I and out of close to 100 birds at the time, I only loss two chickens to the heat. One was a Broiler that my daughter adopted, and as such I wasn't allowed to process and the other was a Lakenvelder (golden)

    I'm pretty sure that heat wasn't a factor in the broiler as poor Shelley was 5 months old and quite a big girl (it could have exacerbated her problems though), and I can't say definitively that it killed the other Lakenvelder as her 3 other sisters weathered it fine.

    When it gets hot, just provide them with good shade, plenty of ventilation, and in extreme heat ice (I filled up old 2 liter coke bottles with water and froze them then threw out in the chicken run for them), and even in Texas, most breeds will be fine!

    Best of luck!
     
  2. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Colmesneil,TX

    Buff Orpington 3 eggs a week? Are you serious? My hatchery Buff Orpingtons gave me 6-7 a week their first year and are doing 5-6 now. Even my "poor laying" breeder quality ones are better than that now, with 5-6 a week. Also, for heat tolerance of the breed I will just say this. They seemed to suffer no more than any other chicken during our horrible summer. I was out with them yesterday when it was pretty hot for this time of year. The Barred Rock and the Dark Cornish had their wings out like they were hot but the Orps were fine. I'm not saying the Orps are the breed to get, just that what I read above about Orpingtons is inaccurate.
     
  3. bj taylor

    bj taylor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2011
    North Central Texas
    i live in north central texas. heat was a big factor in my choices. because i have have to start out with a run that has no top (so i needed heavies) and because i wanted dual purpose, and because i wanted fairly gentle, (and pretty), i went for silver laced wyandotte, buff orpington, black australorp, and barred rock. i'm sure hoping my choices were good. my grand adventure begins next week (if they get here ok).
     
  4. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas

    The numbers are average per year. You may have also been very lucky with your hens. If your Orpingtons can lay nearly 350 eggs a year, I would recommend that you breed them and sell them to farmers producing eggs.

    http://www.mypetchicken.com/chicken-breeds/Orpington-B80.aspx

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orpington_(chicken)

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/products/orpington#description
     
  5. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Colmesneil,TX

    Simply saying "3 a week" makes it sound like in any given week, you'll only get one egg every three days. You're talking to someone who owns them and logs each layer's eggs, some each of hatchery and breeder stock, not someone that just got finished looking on Wiki. No need to be smart.

    Your source for Barred Rock, 4 eggs a week, looks to be straight from My Pet Chicken. While your 3 a week appear to be your own rounding down from Wiki's numbers (175-200 per year) which looks to be really close to the very same figure, but the way you have it stated it looks like Orps lay 150 a year while Barred Rock lay 200 a year. Wait, Orps lay 200 a year according to Wiki, don't they?

    ETA: And yes, I do have one that lays well over 200 a year. Her chicks are due to hatch next week, barring any horrid accidents with the incubator.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2012
  6. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That would mean you get about 4 eggs a week on average in a year. As I said, maybe you have been lucky with your hens. Some are better layers than others.

    So a Buff Orpington will lay about 3 or 4 eggs a week on average in a year. How is that?
     
  7. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Colmesneil,TX
    That is more accurate. How many do yours lay?
     
  8. ronniewayne

    ronniewayne Chillin' With My Peeps

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    QUEEN CITY,CASS COUNTY
    In North east tx my best layers are red comets (red sex links) 1st laying yr ave 6 eggs per week had a hot dry summer and no lights for winter mine do free range and i have winter pasture for them although they are not great stew hens. next i would say are the rhode island reds..ave about 5 eggs per week 1st yr.. then the barred rock seems to do 4 to 5....the latter 2 larger so more stew meat..although i recommend raising broilers for meat and sell your hens after 1st yr lay from a pure money standpoint you will come out better. it goes without saying here to represent the hens you sell to the buyer as to their real age...some people dont care if they are over a year old. good luck sounds like you will have a real mix of breeds..
     
  9. robisonfamily7

    robisonfamily7 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2012
    Houston, TX
    Im looking forward to my red sex links.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2012
  10. robisonfamily7

    robisonfamily7 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2012
    Houston, TX
    I do not have a lot of space, as they are in a closed-in chicken tractor, so I have not yet decided whether I could hatch chicks or not. My chicken tractor has a yard space of 8' x 5' and I am running 15 chickens in it. So a rooster would take up space and feed and not increase egg production. So, I am open to suggestions, but I do not see how I could raise chicks.
    Another thing, I was told to NEVER introduce new pullets into an old batch, or the older ladies would peck them to death.

    Thanks
    Dman
     

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