Cocoa has watery poop for about 2 weeks

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cluck clucking, Nov 9, 2018 at 4:52 PM.

  1. cluck clucking

    cluck clucking Hatching

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    Hi cocoa an Americana-about 22 weeks old. She’s had runny or watery poop for 2 ish weeks. She lives with 3 other chickens and none of them have the runs. Cocoa loves to eat grass and drink lots of water. She also eats the egg laying organic food. Which we switched to at 19 weeks. She will also eat apples, pumpkin, and tomato. I tried giving her some apple cider vinegar but only a couple times. I also tried giving her some yogurt but also not very consitant. Some of her poop hasn’t lots of grass in it but is still watery. I’m trying to figure out if this is normal or if I should find a better to take some poo to? Open to any suggestions. The picture of the dry grass was taken a couple days after the fact so it’s not runny. As for cocoa’s behavior she sleeps eats and runs around with the rest of the girls. She doesn’t have quite a sense much energy tho. She tried coasting off the 3 ft porch and struggled to land it. We are also giving them treats such as dried meal worms, oats, and sunflower seeds.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018 at 5:05 PM
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    If you have a vet who will do a fecal exam for you, that is best. It's around 15.00 here. It doesn't have to be a poultry vet to detect Cocci or worms. It sounds like she has coccidiosis, and you can go ahead and start her on medication for that by getting some Corid at the feed mill or TSC, wherever you get your feed. You can put it in the drinking water for all of them, for five to seven days, two tsp per gallon. Is she still eating and drinking oK? Acting sick at all? If the Corid doesn't help, she most likely has worms. It is important to address the problem quickly, because chickens can easily die from Coccidiosis or worms.
     
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  3. DollyandMabelsMom

    DollyandMabelsMom In the Brooder

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    Chicknmania in a case like this what would you suggest in a case of worms? We're going through the exact same thing with one of our birds and have already treated with corid and had zero results with that. I've been trying to look up what wormer to use online but I'm not having much luck
     
  4. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    You need to use a broad spectrum dewormer. We use Levamisol, it has been around a long time and does a very good job, and we know it's safe. But you have to buy it on line. Here, we can get Safeguard suspension from our vet; it's also very good. Safeguard dewormer for goats (which is available in feed stores) works for chickens too, but I am not sure of the dose, as I have not used that; but the dose is available on BYC somewhere if you research it. Valbazen is another good dewormer; also available on line, and some feed stores. It is best to deworm every six months, and switch off using different dewormers occasionally, so that resistance buildup is minimal. You should deworm once, then again ten days later, to kill any new worms which may have hatched inside the body. There's a withdrawal for most dewormers, a period where you can't eat the eggs...it varies, depending on the dewormer. Best to deworm the entire flock, and not just the birds that appear to be sick.

    Again, it's always best, if you can, to get the vet to do a fecal exam for you...then you know what you're dealing with. If you have a good relationship with your vet, even if they're not a poultry vet, you can persuade them to do one for you, because parasites are parasites...it really doesn't matter whose poop it is, lol.
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    Getting a fecal float is always a good idea to rule out worms and coccidiosis.

    Check Cocoa's crop first thing in the morning before she has had anything to eat or drink. It should be empty.
    Drinking a lot of water can cause runny poop. It can also be a sign that there is a crop problem or something going on with the kidneys.

    How much grass and other treats is she consuming instead of her normal feed?
     
    micstrachan likes this.
  6. cluck clucking

    cluck clucking Hatching

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    Ok cool. I think we’ll go buy them corid and start that’s today. If I can get a stool sample before noon (when the vet closes) I’ll take it in. She’s definitely eating and drinking lots of water. She still run so aroun does with the 3 other chickens. The others 3 seem to be doing fine too. She’s not acking extremely sick. She might be a little lethargic but not too bad. She doesn’t seem to have as much strength as she normally does.
     
    micstrachan likes this.
  7. cluck clucking

    cluck clucking Hatching

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    She eats a lot of weeds and grass, but so do the other 3 chickens. Her crop was empty this am.
     
    micstrachan likes this.
  8. An empty crop in the morning is a beautiful thing!
     
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  9. cluck clucking

    cluck clucking Hatching

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    We got the liquid Do you know How’s much we should use of the liquid amount per gallon?
     
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Crossing the Road

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    So sorry you didn't get an answer to your question.

    For liquid Corid dosage is 2 teaspoons per gallon of water. Give for 5-7days as the only source of drinking water.

    It's good that the crop was completely empty this morning!
     

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