Coop on it's way

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by scooter147, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,042
    65
    221
    Jul 30, 2008
    Missouri
    My 10 x 12 coop was destroyed in a tornado on Good Friday.
    I just finalized the new coop and it will be delivered and set up on June 16th.
    I carry replacement cost coverage on my homeowners so if my syphering is correct the new 10 x 18 shed will cost me out of pocket about $750. The new coop will have a customized chicken pop door, human door and a larger door that will open to the roost area for EASY cleaning. If I ever sell the coop will easily convert to a multi use storage/garden/ potting shed etc. The good news here is that I removed and cut up the trees that fell on the house, fences and shed so I was reimbursed by the insurance company for all that HARD WORK so I'm really not dipping into "my" funds for the $750.00.

    Part of this coop will be divided off and used a storage.

    Can't wait and will post pictures when complete. I will have to constuct the roosts and put up the wire on the windows to keep the critters out. The nest boxes survived the twister so they will just need to be re-hung.

    Just some friendly advice, double check your homeowners policies, the cost of replacement insurance is well worth the additional cost and in the big picture it's not all that much. I was one that thought that "it won't happen to me" but once again I was proven wrong.

    My other two cents worth. I lost every tree but one and big ones! (three 50' oaks, 50' pecan, 30' maple etc) 9 in total. I was under the impression the insurance company would pay to clean up the entire mess and trust me I almost cried when they told me no. You wouldn't have believed the mess that was my backyard. I literally had to cut my way back to the chicken coop.
    What they will pay for is for trees to be cut off your dwelling, outbuildings and fences and that's a funky formula. For exampe, those that fell on a fence, they will pay up to $500 to have the tree cut up and off the fence and moved 6 feet from the fence line, the rest of the expense is on you. Those that fall on dwellings they will pay to have cut off the dwelling, cut up and hauled to the front of your property but will not pay to have it hauled away and there is convulited formula for that too. That's why even though the task was overwhelming I decided to accept the help of family, friends and co-workers and do it myself.
     
  2. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Tough break but glad to see you're making lemonade out of the lemons! One thing that you may have to add now is more shade for you birds. Another nice thing is tree branches make great perches
     
  3. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,042
    65
    221
    Jul 30, 2008
    Missouri
    Quote:Your right Bryan I have some nice oak ones stacked for roosts.
    Even though all was and sort of still a mess I stopped feeling sorry for myself after the Joplin tornado. WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11
     
  4. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Glad you're recovering ok, got any pics of the new coop [​IMG] (you may have a idea I need to steal since you've had birds for a while and had time to find the issues your old coop had [​IMG] )
     
  5. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,042
    65
    221
    Jul 30, 2008
    Missouri
    Quote:1. the human door does not need to be twice the size of a "normal" human door. Takes up wall space, when open it catches the wind too easily. I originaly thought it would help keep the coop cooler in the summer with a bigger door, I've determined it doesn't

    2. Never have enough windows or ventilation. I went from two windows to four and put in bigger vents in the end gables.

    3. Put at least three coats of that good bathroom paint on the wood floor and paint the walls with it two coats. I didn't paint the walls the last time . This makes it all very easy to clean and helps seals the cracks in the wood to seal off hiding and breeding spots for mites.

    4. Make it bigger than you think you need ;-)

    These are the things that are different about this coop then the old one. The one thing I always suggest to anyone that asks about building a coop and that is a dropping board under the roost is must in my book. It makes clean up so easy and saves money as the coops needs cleaning out less. I only clean my coop twice a year instead of 4 or so since I added the dropping boards.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by