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Cornish X Roo or pullet???

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by desertchicken92, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. desertchicken92

    desertchicken92 Chirping

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    A lady on craigslist is giving away a free cornish x because they sold a batch and this one was friendly so they dont want it to be eaten. I'll keep it as a pet only if its a pullet. These pictures were taken around June 20th, I dont know the age of the chicken. Any help sexing it would be great. so, Roo or pullet???[​IMG]

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  2. Basskids08

    Basskids08 Chick Logging

    It's young, probably about 4 weeks, looking like a cockerel too!
     
  3. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 Free Ranging Premium Member

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    X2 on probable cockerel, considering how fast they grow, as small as it is that is a lot of comb.
     
  4. desertchicken92

    desertchicken92 Chirping

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    She suspects hen, but...I guess thats why she's trying to get rid of it for free and so fast... I had my doubts, thanks guys![​IMG]
     
  5. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Cockerel
     
  6. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Crowing

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    Probably a cockerel.
     
  7. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Crowing

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    Looks like a male to me.
     

  8. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Crowing

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    Why you would want a Cornish X pullet instead of a cockerel? The Cornish X are bred to be abnormally fast growing meat birds, and the hens are basically worthless as layers. Cornish X are usually butchered for the table at 8-10 weeks. If you wait much later than that, they start to develop all kinds of health problems due to their abnormally fast growth, and the hens rarely live to reach laying age, and even if they do, they are huge feed consumers and very poor layers. Since they are only good as meat birds, and since the cockerels get somewhat larger than the hens, most people usually prefer to purchase the cockerels for eating purposes.
     

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