crossing a game rooster with a dominic hen

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by woogie g3, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:It was my understanding that rosecombs were recessive to straight combs. Am I wrong?
     
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:It was my understanding that rosecombs were recessive to straight combs. Am I wrong?

    Rosecomb dominant over single (wildtype) comb.
     
  3. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:
    What did the female counter parts look like?

    As chicks solid Black. I culled all females as chicks as I new I wanted to start the breeding program with a F1 Male.
    I would think the grey coding would obliterate some of what would otherwise be a nearly black bird and barring would be lacking.

    Correct.
    How gamey are the F1 stags

    He has some Game and don't like to be pushed around but not a Ace.

    Chris​
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Chris,

    Did game rooster used to make cross have white in tail? That is something I want to select against.
     
  5. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:What is it your trying to do? Forgot to ask Grey what? and dominique hen?

    rancher

    What is it your trying to do?

    Improve type on my American Dominique.

    Forgot to ask Grey what

    Grey as in the type of American Gamefowl (not a color).

    and dominique hen

    American Dominique Hen.


    Chris
    l​
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
  6. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:Nope, it was Black.

    Chris
     
  7. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    OK,
    I found a picture of the Rooster I used in the cross.

    Rooster -
    [​IMG]

    Hen -
    [​IMG]

    Stag -
    [​IMG]

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
    1 person likes this.
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Chris,

    Biggest challenge I see is with getting black out of tail. Multiple loci must be involved. My objective is barred tail with feather morphology of game.
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:Did you have reason behind grey as game sire?
     
  10. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:I think I may be able to get nearly all the black out of the tail of the F2's but I think the hardest to breed out is going to be the Gold and the wing bow. That might take some time and I might even see a little wing bow in some of the F4's stags.
    Here is some information on barring that I posted in another thread.

    The below information is from the book Exhibition Poultry Keeping by David Scrivener [​IMG]2005

    Barring Gene: B
    This is a Sex-link gene that stops and starts pigment production as in feather growth to give the well-known barring pattern as seen on Barred Wyandottes and Scots Greys. The extremely narrow and sharp barring seen on the Barred Plymouth Rocks is achieved by the presence of the gene ('K') for very slow feathering growth,which allows for a lot of on/off sequences in the time it takes for a feather to grow. The same barring gene ('B') when on a rapid feathering breed gives wide, coarse, fuzzy "Cuckoo Barring" as seen on Cuckoo Marans, Cuckoo Pekins (Cochins) and others. The barring gene also interacts with the gene on the E locus, all of the above examples being based on the E plus melantoics. Thus all these barring and cuckoo breeds would be self-black if they did not have the barring gene. This gene has greater pigment-restricting effect on black pigment than it does on red or gold pigment. When the barring gene is applied to the Wild Type pattern, the Crele variety is produced; and the barring on Columbian pattern combination is seen on Rhodebars, one of the autosexing breeds.
    It is to be hoped that most, preferably all readers of this book are already familiar with the principles of sex-linkage. They should be aware that the barring gene is not completely dominant to non-barring, which is why both dark- and light-barred males are seen, but only dark-barred females.
    In most breeds with a Crele variety, Crele OEG for example, the richer colored males that have only one barring gene are exhibited, but in the autosexing breeds only light males carry two barring gene should be exhibited and (in normal circumstances) bred from. The phrase "in normal circumstances" is used here becouse some inbred strains of autosexing breeds are sometimes revived by crossing with the other related breed, for example Brown Leghorn for Gold Legbars. Dark Crele males may be used as part of the process.


    Chris
     

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