dealing with Emergencies

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by 4H kids and mom, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. 4H kids and mom

    4H kids and mom Cooped Up

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    Mar 10, 2007
    Southern Wisconsin
    My kids and packed a little first aid kit to hang right in the coop in case we should need it right away so we dont have to search around for it when time may be of the essence. We put in things like:

    *Steptic powder (to stop bleeding)
    *Scissors
    *Splinting Material
    *Tweezers
    *Hemroid cream (in case of prolapse)
    *Vasoline (in case of binding)
    *Plastic gloves (to be hygenic)
    *Triple antibiotic cream (to treat a wound)
    *Bag of GroGel Plus (to give immediate food & fluids to a non eating chicken)
    *Sample size bag of kitty food (for quick protein boost)
    *Bag of Super Vitamins (for a stressed chicken, or just for a boost)
    *Several types of antibiotics and meds for chickens (for various problems, and illnesses)


    Its just a start, but I think the idea of keeping a kit handy right in the coop could be a time saver if the need arose. Just though we'd share our handy idea! [​IMG]
     
  2. mudhen

    mudhen confidently clueless

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    Jan 15, 2007
    Shepherdstown, WV
    Good thinking!
    There was a thread about this very topic a while back:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=454
    and it has a super list and some ideas I hadn't thought of including having a first aid kit for dogs.
    Anyway, it would be nice to compile this info and post it as a sticky for reference and/or in the BYC Home Learning pages.
    I would be happy to do it if anyone thinks its worthwhile?
    (I already have a copy I put together for myself).
     
  3. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    And a label to put on the outside of the box should read something like: Stop Look & Listen First

    That would hopefully be a reminder not to go in a scoop a bird up if it looks like there is trouble but to take the time in its element to study what it is doing that got your attention first before attempting any kind of treatment.
     
  4. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Here is an excellent article expounding on Robins advice and explaining why it is so important to stop and take note and what you should look for:
    http://caltest.vet.upenn.edu/poultry/Syllabus/page32_.htm

    Here is my collected articles on various emergencies including first aid kits etc.:
    http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=emergencies

    Silkie and Polish owners: Be aware that crook neck from head injury is fairly common: print out Alans article and have vit E/selenium combination to hand (here is the link to Alan Stanfords treatment article for injury related crookneck:
    http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=casestudiesemergencies&action=display&num=1160927052

    Prevention is better than cure...in addition to the information here, take the time to read through the basic fact sheets on care and feeding of your chickens, disinfection, early signs of trouble, etc. (here are my collected articles on the basics):
    http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=FAQ
     
  5. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Diana, you'll appreciate this story. (I still need to answer your email, I haven't forgotten)

    Someone on another board pounded on me because I told a bird owner not to go jumping to antibiotics with what she had described she saw. I told her to take a minute to get a feel for what was going on.

    Next day she posted that there wasn't a thing wrong with her bird that it was her hen's reaction to a new bird in the coop.

    Seeing the big picture is as important as treatment as long as you have all of the facts.
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    xactly...that is why I have that first article posted as a FAQ...on the other side of the coin though, many just dont bother with reading general info and learning how to recognize warning signs until way too late .
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2007

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