Dealing with MG- Opinions PLEASE

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by freestargirl, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. freestargirl

    freestargirl Out Of The Brooder

    86
    2
    41
    Jul 19, 2011
    NC Foothills
    I've had a self-sustaining flock for several years with a strict no bird in/no bird out rule. We've dealt with some health issues over the years, but nothing like this. My flock seems to be pretty hearty.

    Earlier in the summer, a snake got all of our chicks that we'd just hatched. In a moment of panic, I bought 3 20 wk old pullets from a NPIP certified farm. My friend bought 3 also. She integrated after 3 wks., 1 of her *new* ones got sick- lethargic, had what she described as pasty butt and died within 48 hrs of symptom onset. I still hadn't integrated mine yet, but mine didn't have those symptoms so I integrated mine. Her other 2 got lethargic, so they culled them.

    My birds seemed to be fine, until 8 days after integration. Mine are having different symptoms. Some of my older birds started having "bubbly discharge" in their eyes Thursday night. I haven't done testing, but based on symptoms, I am sure we are dealing with mycoplasma gallisepticum. I began treating with oxytetracycline in their water, yesterday, and 3 hens were then having nasal discharge- 1 being one of the young new ones.

    These are my 2 options, right now.

    1) I can still save the flock. I have 2 broody hens, 1 with 3 babies, and 1 on 4 eggs that are supposed to hatch in 4 days, and they have never been in contact with the new hens. I can cull the rest of my flock and be MG free moving forward with two 3 yr old hens and their offspring. (My hubby isn't thrilled with this idea, not being convinced that they haven't accidentally been exposed, which I have read is thru shared waterers, exposure to infected nasal secretions, etc) We ofcourse feed and water the young first, and they are up in boxes, so we aren't walking in their area with shoes. We can clean out the coop and let the chicken run 'rest' for awhile. If I am going to cull and practically start over, I'd rather do it now than later.

    2) Deal with the MG- treating when symptoms flair up during times of stress, have reduced food efficiency, egg production & egg viability. But will always have it. Death rates are low, but sickness is high. I have read a few places that some birds can build up a tolerance to it. There is the possibility that some of my birds may never have symptoms, but it will always be present.


    What are your thoughts?
     
  2. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

    77,802
    28,693
    906
    Sep 26, 2013
    madison Indiana
    I also have a suspected crd flock. I did cull most of the flock and restarted. Like you I thought the babies were never exposed. I was wrong. after restarting the flock and building up a nice one it was back. crd is very common as it can , in my case, be caught by the grass I hand pulled for them. (I believe). any way new flock is infected. I have chose to treat . Denaguard mixed with molasses is very effective. It was one a month but after 3 months Its on a as needed basis. one every 3 or so months. I prefer this method . I would recommend if your going to get rid of some , do them all. I am very sorry for your problems and wish you the best.. Please note, More people have this then told. and next time you bring new in, make sure you have a few extra birds . instead of waiting to see if the new ones get sick, add one of yours to the new ones. If yours gets sick then destroy them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

    8,904
    4,072
    456
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    You don't actually have a diagnosis; get testing done, and then if you cull, do a complete bird removal, clean, and wait four weeks before bringing in new birds. There's no way you have completely isolated everything on farm or home conditions, and the eggs carry it through generations. Mary
     
  4. chickengr

    chickengr Overrun With Chickens

    3,001
    721
    281
    Dec 29, 2014
    greece
    if you don't test your birds you cannot know if they have MG. when my birds were sick the first thing my wet said it was MG - for the symptoms. but when he did a blood test it was infestious bronchitis. I treated them with doxycycline for 40 days and they got well. only my cockerel needed 2 injections of bytril besides doxycycline and he got well too.

    I have 2-3 pullets that sneeze from time to time but no other symptoms and no other birds have any problem. it is hot and dry here so it might be just dust in their nostrils.

    bubbly discharge from their eyes can be from some allergies as well. nasal discharge can be from the stress as well. don't diagnose based on symptoms only. if you give them antibiotics and the symptoms persist then it might be something more serious.

    I had the best results with baytril.

    test your birds before taking any decisions! good luck!
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,247
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. chickengr

    chickengr Overrun With Chickens

    3,001
    721
    281
    Dec 29, 2014
    greece
    yes, I treated them with antibiotics for the secondary infections. for the viral part I gave them acv, garlic, oregano, thyme, etc.
     
  7. freestargirl

    freestargirl Out Of The Brooder

    86
    2
    41
    Jul 19, 2011
    NC Foothills
    Thanks so far everyone! We're still not sure what we're going to do. I'm calling tomorrow about testing so we know what it is. This morning, I had 4 hens that didn't want to come out of the coop when I let them out into the run. Some had visible discharge and some didn't. One of the roosters was making rattly, growling/mucusy noises. The other rooster, who has a large comb is showing cyanosis on his comb. :-( This was well over 36 hrs on oxytetracycline and no real improvement, so I am strongly suspecting something viral at this point. I'm not aware of any avian vets in the area, so I'm gonna call around tomorrow for that too. It's just too coincidental that it started 8 days after introducing the 3 new hens that had no symptoms and that my friend who bought hens from the same farm had symptoms but they were different.

    I know that many illnesses can show no symptoms ever. Poop looked normal, and so far the only one who shows signs of diarrhea is an older hen who has it occasionally and slows down for a day or two but then perks back up. And she is not one of the ones with any respiratory symptoms.

    I am giving them fresh oregano, and am going to dig up some garlic for them when I get done here.

    I am also beginning to think that its something in our coop or run. At first I suspected the water source- we have gutters and rainbarrel on the coop, that my hubby put in over the winter while I was pregnant and complained about carrying 5 gallon buckets of water down there when it was cold. We have a rooster that my cousin gave just for meat several weeks ago. He is in quarantine, as we were never intending to integrate him at all, just hadn't gotten around to processing him. The new hens were housed next to him- sheet of plywood between them. After we integrated the new hens, I took their almost full waterer and gave to the rooster and he has zero symptoms. He has also been watered out of the rain barrel. There have never been chickens or livestock of any sort on the land here, unless it was like 100 years ago. We are treating him as well.

    We have had a pretty humid summer, but then it go hot hot and dry weather.The day I noticed the first symptoms, it rained, hard and rained the next 2 days. So I'm also considering that it could be fungal or the previous dry conditions. I know chickens have very sensitive respiratory systems, it just strikes me as really odd that we have it now.

    As far as the ones I referred to that haven't been exposed- if it's something that the meat rooster or new hens brought in, one is in a plywood brooder on our carport, and the other in a pet carrier also on our carport. They were removed from the main flock before the new birds were integrated. I realize that if it is something that was already here, then they have been exposed and are carriers.
    Just can't make an educated decision until we have testing done.
     
  8. freestargirl

    freestargirl Out Of The Brooder

    86
    2
    41
    Jul 19, 2011
    NC Foothills
    So I've been reading about infection bronchitis, and I'm not convinced that's it- we have had a slight drop in egg laying- we avg. 1-5 eggs a day the past several months, Friday we had 4, Saturday we had 3 and not sure how many we have yet today. Also i've read IB involves their uro-genital tract and that deformed or absent shells are a sign/symptom. Our eggs have been normal shelled. ??? Just thinking out loud.
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,247
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    You're correct about IB. Telltale signs of IB are usually wrinkled eggs and watery whites. Keep in mind that mixing antibiotic soluable powders in water isnt a very effective way treating birds with respiratory diseases. Sick birds rarely drink, if at all. Injecting antibiotics is more effective. Even if they recover, they are still carriers for life. Your other option is to cull and disinfect everything and repopulate in several months, preferably purchasing chicks from a reputable hatchery.
    As far as testing goes; you can contact your local extension office for information, or a vet. It would be best to submit your sickest bird for necropsy. Be sure to let us know the test results. Good luck.
     
  10. Woobsie

    Woobsie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Don't cull until you can get a test or tests done. If it is MG I would assume they all are exposed by now. Tylan is amazing for treating the symptoms with MG. I do believe MG is abundant in many many flocks and goes rampant in poultry shows.....and people really are ignorant to it or turn a blind eye. It is also something that many responsible animal owners become aware of too late. I just went through 2 weeks of MG nightmare here [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by